Dixie Chicken (bar)

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Dixie Chicken back entrance

The Dixie Chicken, also known as The Chicken, has been "College Station's most famous watering hole since 1974,"[1] and is notable for its role in Texas A&M University tradition.[2][3][4] "Nationally known,"[5] the Dixie Chicken claims to serve the most beer per square foot of any bar in the United States.[6]

Overview[edit]

“One of the most recognizable restaurants in College Station,”[7] the Dixie Chicken is known as Texas A&M's "favorite local watering hole."[8] The Dixie Chicken is the oldest and most famous bar in the Northgate district,[9] has a live rattlesnake on the premises,[10] and is home to a weekly domino tournament.[11] The Dixie Chicken was founded by Don Anz and Don Ganter, businessmen who were involved with several organizations related to Texas A&M.[12] Ganter died in 2004, just days after the Dixie Chicken had its 30th anniversary.[13]

Ring dunking[edit]

In the late 1970s, the Aggie tradition of "ring dunking" began at the Dixie Chicken.[14] In this tradition concerning Ring Day, a student drops their class ring into a pitcher of beer which is then chugged on the back porch of the Dixie Chicken.[15] This is not a university-sanctioned tradition, though some estimate that anywhere between 25 to 75 percent of students dunk their rings.[16] Along with a drinking provision that went into effect on April 3, 2005, instead of pitchers, students are only allowed to buy 32 ounce (950 mL) mugs of beer on Ring Day at the Dixie Chicken. Ring Dunking elsewhere, however, remains unregulated.[17] In his comments to the Texas A&M graduating class of Fall 2008, President George W. Bush stated that, "Back in my day, I think I would have enjoyed dunk [sic] my ring."[18] The president also joked about the absence of his Secretary of Defense (and former president of A&M) Robert Gates from the ceremony by stating, "It's not like he's over at the Dixie Chicken.”[19]

Awards[edit]

In April 2006, the Dixie Chicken was named "College Bar of the Month" in Playboy.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Homer Jacobs, Kevin Bartram, Glen Johnson (2003). "The Pride of Aggieland". Texas A&M University Press. Retrieved 2009-02-04. 
  2. ^ Yale Daily News (2009). "The Insider's Guide to the Colleges 2009". Yale Daily News. Retrieved 2009-02-04. 
  3. ^ Vault Editors (2006). "The College Buzz Book". Vault Inc. Retrieved 2009-02-04. 
  4. ^ Olin Buchanan (2004). "Stadium Stories". Globe Pequot. Retrieved 2009-02-04. 
  5. ^ Nishat Fatima (2004-09-23). "XL Cover Story: The true core of College Station". Austin American-Statesman. Retrieved 2009-02-04. 
  6. ^ a b "The Dixie Chicken". On Campus. Playboy Magazine. Archived from the original on 2006-04-28. Retrieved 2006-04-27. 
  7. ^ Clair Lavender (2008-09-03). "Students rave about restaurants in College Station that not only define a community, but a culture.". The Battalion. Retrieved 2009-02-05. 
  8. ^ Mark Schabach (2006-08-14). "Texas A&M hoops finds place on football's back". ESPN. Retrieved 2009-02-04. 
  9. ^ Hensley, Laura (2006-09-23). "Promenade drinking ban sends crowds to other bars". The Eagle (newspaper). Retrieved 2009-01-06. 
  10. ^ Matthew Berry (2007-11-21). "Love/Hate for Week 12". ESPN. Retrieved 2009-02-04. 
  11. ^ Jesse Wright (2002-04-24). "Aggies spend time, earn money playing in domino tournaments". The Battalion. Retrieved 2009-02-05. 
  12. ^ Luke Jackson (2004-11-22). "Dixie Chicken owner Don Ganter dies". The Battalion. Retrieved 2009-02-04. 
  13. ^ Lindsay Liepman (2004-11-23). "Dixie Chicken Owner Dies". KBTX-TV. Retrieved 2009-02-04. 
  14. ^ Jenna Janik (2005-09-26). "Unofficial tradition of ring dunking began on accident". The Battalion. Retrieved 2009-02-04. 
  15. ^ Hallett, Vicky (2005). "The Aggie Way of Life". U.S. News & World Report. Archived from the original on 2005-08-26. Retrieved 2009-02-04. 
  16. ^ Matthew Watkins (2007-11-15). "A&M's ring dunking 'tradition' potentially dangerous". The Eagle (newspaper). Retrieved 2009-02-04. 
  17. ^ Victoria White (2005-04-14). "Drinking on the Northgate promenade will not be allowed for Ring Day". The Battalion. Retrieved 2009-02-05. 
  18. ^ George W. Bush (2008-12-12). "Bush Delivers Commencement Address at Texas A & M University". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2009-02-04. 
  19. ^ "Bush mentions local bar in speech". The Eagle (newspaper). 2008-12-13. Retrieved 2009-02-04. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 30°37′04″N 96°20′47″W / 30.617815°N 96.346304°W / 30.617815; -96.346304