Dixie Dregs

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The Dixie Dregs
Andy West.jpg
Andy West and Allen Sloan of the Dixie Dregs live in 1999
Background information
Also known as Dixie Grit (1970-1971)
Rock Ensemble II (1973)
The Dregs (1981-present)
Origin Augusta, Georgia
Genres Hard rock, rock, jazz fusion, southern rock, progressive rock
Years active 1970–present
Labels Capricorn, Anthem
Website Steve Morse
Members Steve Morse
Rod Morgenstein
Dave LaRue
Jerry Goodman
Past members Andy West
Frank Brittingham
Dave Morse
Johnny Carr
Mark Parrish
Allen Sloan, M.D.
Bart Yarnall
Gilbert Frayer
Frank Josephs
Steve Davidowski
T Lavitz
Mark O'Connor

The Dixie Dregs is an American band formed in the 1970s. Their mostly instrumental music fuses jazz, southern rock, bluegrass and classical forms in an often unique style.

History[edit]

Formation and early years[edit]

The Dixie Dregs evolved from an Augusta, Georgia band called Dixie Grit, formed by Steve Morse and Andy West in 1970. The band featured Morse's older brother Dave on drums, Frank Brittingham (guitar and vocals) and Johnny Carr (keyboards). Carr was later replaced by Mark Parrish. Shortly after Steve Morse's enrollment at University of Miami's School of Music in 1971, Dixie Grit was disbanded. Morse and West continued performing as a duet, calling themselves Dixie Dregs (the "Dregs" of "Dixie Grit").[1]

In 1973, Steve Morse (guitar), Andy West (bass), Allen Sloan (violin) and Bart Yarnal (drums) met while students at the University of Miami's School of Music to play as Rock Ensemble II. West also attended Georgia State University for a year while studying cello and music theory & composition along with Parrish. Parrish remained at GSU during the academic school years only to return to Augusta, Georgia during summer breaks - re-establishing the guitar/bass/keyboards/drums quartet with Morse, West, Parrish, and Gilbert Frayer (drums) performing as opening acts for concerts and headlining local gigs as the Dixie Dregs.

During subsequent academic school years, the remaining members of the Dregs — including Andy West — returned to the University of Miami and Mark Parrish returned to Atlanta, Georgia to complete his degree in music performance and composition at Georgia State University under the study of William Masselos, with additional studies of electronic music at Columbia University in New York City under Alice Shields - a protégé of Wendy Carlos.

First recording[edit]

At the time, the University of Miami hosted a lively musical community, including future greats Pat Metheny, Jaco Pastorius, Danny Gottlieb, T Lavitz and Bruce Hornsby. Rod Morgenstein was asked to fill in as drummer after a surfing accident disabled Yarnal. In 1974, during the school years at UofM, keyboardist Frank Josephs was added to their lineup. In 1975, the group's first effort, The Great Spectacular (named by ex-"Dixie Grit" second guitarist and singer, Frank Brittingham) was recorded at the University. Approximately 1,000 copies of the original LP were pressed. The album was reissued in 1997 in CD form.

Signed to Capricorn[edit]

Based on the strength of a three song demo and a tip from former Allman Brothers Band members Chuck Leavell and Twiggs Lyndon, Capricorn Records signed them in late 1976 to record Free Fall (1977). Steve Davidowski was the keyboardist on "Free Fall". When Steve left to work with fiddler Vassar Clements, former Dixie Grit/Dixie Dregs keyboardist Mark Parrish rejoined the group later that year. The moderate success and critical acclaim of Free Fall led to their 1978 effort, What If, supported by their first tour with dates in New York, Georgia, Florida, South Carolina, North Carolina, Texas, Arizona, Massachusetts, Mississippi, and California.

Their fourth album, Night of the Living Dregs (featuring Morse, West, Sloan, Parrish, and Morgenstein), was released in April 1979, gaining the band their first Grammy nomination for Best Rock Instrumental Performance - won that year by Paul McCartney's band Wings. Night of the Living Dregs included studio recordings as well as compositions performed live and recorded at the Montreux Jazz Festival on July 23, 1978. Ken Scott - The Beatles' and producer/arranger George Martin's right-hand man and engineer - produced both Dixie Dregs albums What If and Night of the Living Dregs.

Switch to Arista[edit]

In October 1979, Capricorn Records declared bankruptcy, and the band was signed by Arista Records in January 1980, to create three albums. At that time, keyboardist Parrish left and was replaced by T Lavitz. Later that year, Dregs of the Earth (featuring Morse, West, Sloan, Lavitz, and Morgenstein) was released.

Parrish went on to play piano and keyboards for vocalists Andy Williams, Roberta Flack, Natalie Cole, Luther Vandross, Peabo Bryson, Celine Dion, Regina Belle, Deborah Gibson, Pat Boone and daughter Debby Boone, Glen Campbell and for guitarist Larry Coryell. He won an Angel Award as co-producer of a Christian album, where he arranged and played all the instrumental segments. He has also been musical director, conductor, and keyboard instrumentalist with the touring stage shows of Cats, Meet Me in St. Louis, The Wizard of Oz, Little Shop of Horrors, Nunsense, Brigadoon, The Phantom of the Opera, Anything Goes, and other Broadway stage shows.

Name change[edit]

Steve Morse with the Dixie Dregs at the Roxy Theatre, August 28, 1999

For Unsung Heroes, released in 1981, the band changed their name to The Dregs in an effort to gain more commercial appeal. Violinist Sloan was replaced by Mark O'Connor, winner of Nashville's Grand Masters Fiddle Championship for their 1982 release, Industry Standard. This album introduced vocals for the first time as a further attempt to gain more airtime. Guest vocalists included the Doobie Brothers's Patrick Simmons and Alex Ligertwood (Santana). Industry Standard provided the Dregs with another Grammy nomination for Best Rock/Jazz Instrumental Performance. The recent name change, vocal additions and a grueling touring schedule did nothing to improve sales and the members of The Dregs parted for individual projects.

Reunion[edit]

In the late 1980s, the group reunited for a tour featuring former members Morse, Morgenstein (who was also playing with Winger), Lavitz and Sloan. Their return was complemented by a "Best Of" release entitled Divided We Stand (1989). Bassist Dave LaRue completed the line-up for a seven date tour culminating in the 1992 live album Bring 'em Back Alive, which garnered them a second Grammy nomination for Best Rock Instrumental Performance in January, 1993 - awarded to Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble for "Little Wing". Violinist Jerry Goodman, of The Mahavishnu Orchestra fame, filled in for Sloan, who was frequently absent as a result of his busy medical career. They signed a deal with former label Capricorn Records for their first studio album in years entitled Full Circle in 1994.

Today[edit]

The Dregs to this day remain a loose collection of its former members, reuniting briefly for short tours and rare studio work. 1997's releases were The Great Spectacular in April and King Biscuit Flour Hour Presents (originally recorded in 1979 for the King Biscuit radio show) in September. California Screamin' (2000) is a curious mix of live recordings from the performances at the Roxy Theatre in August 1999. This release features older compositions and covers of the Allman Brothers Band's "Jessica", and Frank Zappa's "Peaches en Regalia" (with Dweezil Zappa sharing guitar lead). 20th Century Masters: The Best Of The Dixie Dregs and the DVD Sects, Dregs and Rock 'n' Roll were released in 2002.

Personnel[edit]

Members[edit]

Timeline[edit]

Lineups[edit]

1970
As "Dixie Grit"
1970-1971
As "Dixie Grit"
1971-1973 1973
  • Frank Brittingham - guitar, vocals
  • Johnny Carr - keyboards
  • Dave Morse - drums
  • Steve Morse - guitar
  • Andy West - bass guitar
  • Frank Brittingham - guitar, vocals
  • Dave Morse - drums
  • Steve Morse - guitar
  • Andy West - bass guitar
  • Mark Parrish - keyboards
  • Steve Morse - guitar
  • Andy West - bass guitar
As "Rock Ensemble II"
  • Steve Morse - guitar
  • Andy West - bass guitar
  • Allen Sloan, M.D. - violin
  • Bart Yarnall - drums
As "Dixie Dregs"
  • Steve Morse - guitar
  • Andy West - bass guitar
  • Mark Parrish - keyboards
  • Gilbert Frayer - drums
1973-1974 1974-1975 1975-1977 1977-1978
  • Steve Morse - guitar
  • Andy West - bass guitar
  • Allen Sloan, M.D. - violin
  • Rod Morgenstein - drums
  • Steve Morse - guitar
  • Andy West - bass guitar
  • Allen Sloan, M.D. - violin
  • Rod Morgenstein - drums
  • Frank Josephs - keyboards
  • Steve Morse - guitar
  • Andy West - bass guitar
  • Allen Sloan, M.D. - violin
  • Rod Morgenstein - drums
  • Steve Davidowski - keyboards
  • Steve Morse - guitar
  • Andy West - bass guitar
  • Allen Sloan, M.D. - violin
  • Rod Morgenstein - drums
  • Mark Parrish - keyboards
1978-1981 1981-1982 1982-1988 1988-1992
  • Steve Morse - guitar
  • Andy West - bass guitar
  • Allen Sloan, M.D. - violin
  • Rod Morgenstein - drums
  • T Lavitz - keyboards
  • Steve Morse - guitar
  • Andy West - bass guitar
  • Rod Morgenstein - drums
  • T Lavitz - keyboards
  • Mark O'Connor - violin
  • Steve Morse - guitar
  • Andy West - bass guitar
  • Rod Morgenstein - drums
  • T Lavitz - keyboards
  • Steve Morse - guitar
  • Rod Morgenstein - drums
  • T Lavitz - keyboards
  • Dave LaRue - bass guitar
  • Allen Sloan, M.D. - violin
1992-2010 2010-present
  • Steve Morse - guitar
  • Rod Morgenstein - drums
  • T Lavitz - keyboards
  • Dave LaRue - bass guitar
  • Jerry Goodman - violin
  • Steve Morse - guitar
  • Rod Morgenstein - drums
  • Dave LaRue - bass guitar
  • Jerry Goodman - violin

Discography[edit]

Studio albums[edit]

Live albums[edit]

  • Bring 'Em Back Alive (1992)
  • King Biscuit Flower Hour Presents (September 16, 1997)
  • California Screamin' (February 1, 2000)
  • From the Front Row... Live! (Dolby 5.1 DVD-Audio, 2003)

Compilations[edit]

  • The Best of the Dregs: Divided We Stand (compilation, 1989)
  • 20th Century Masters: The Best of the Dixie Dregs (March 26, 2002)

Video albums[edit]

  • Sects, Dregs and Rock 'n' Roll (DVD, December 2002)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.stevemorse.info/timeline/1970s.html See section entitled "1970" and "1972"

External links[edit]