Doctor Ross

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For the fictional character, see Dr Doug Ross.
Doctor Ross
Birth name Charles Isaiah Ross
Born (1925-10-21)October 21, 1925
Tunica, Mississippi, United States
Died May 28, 1993(1993-05-28) (aged 67)
Genres Detroit blues
Occupation(s) Singer, guitarist, harmonica player, drummer, one-man band
Instruments Harmonica, drums
Years active 1951–1993

Doctor Ross (October 21, 1925 – May 28, 1993[1]), born Charles Isaiah Ross in Tunica, Mississippi, aka Doctor Ross, the harmonica boss, was an American blues singer, guitarist, harmonica player and drummer.[2]

Ross's blues style has been compared to John Lee Hooker and Sonny Boy Williamson I. His recordings for Sun Records in the 1950s include "The Boogie Disease" and "Chicago Breakdown".

Biography[edit]

In 1951 Ross's material began to get air play in Mississippi and Arkansas. He recorded with Chess Records and Sun with a group that included folk instruments such as a washboard .[2]

In 1954 Ross moved to the Detroit area and began work with General Motors.[2] He recorded some singles with Fortune Records, including "Industrial Boogie". He had an album come out on Testament Records and worked with the American Folk Blues Festival in Europe in 1965.[2]

He recorded an album with Blue Horizon Records while he was in London, and worked with Ornament Records in Germany in 1972.[3] Ross and his music were popular in Europe, more so than in his home country.[2]

Ross won a Grammy for his 1981 album Rare Blues, and subsequently enjoyed a resurgence of popularity and critical acclaim towards the end of his career.

He died in 1993, at the age of 67, and was buried in Flint, Michigan.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ankeny, Jason. Allmusic biography
  2. ^ a b c d e Russell, Tony (1997). The Blues - From Robert Johnson to Robert Cray. Dubai: Carlton Books Limited. p. 163. ISBN 1-85868-255-X. 
  3. ^ Wirz, Stefan (January 8, 2010). "Ornament Discography". American Music. Retrieved January 30, 2010. 

External links[edit]