Dodola, Ethiopia

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Dodola, Ethiopia
Dodola, Ethiopia is located in Ethiopia
Dodola, Ethiopia
Dodola, Ethiopia
Location within Ethiopia
Coordinates: 6°59′N 39°11′E / 6.983°N 39.183°E / 6.983; 39.183Coordinates: 6°59′N 39°11′E / 6.983°N 39.183°E / 6.983; 39.183
Country  Ethiopia
Region Oromia
Zone Mirab Arsi Zone
Population (2005)
 • Total 24,767
Time zone EAT (UTC+3)

Dodola is a town in southeastern Ethiopia. Located in the Mirab Arsi Zone of the Oromia Region, this town has a latitude and longitude of 06°59′N 39°11′E / 6.983°N 39.183°E / 6.983; 39.183, with an elevation ranging from 2362 to 2493 meters above sea level. It is the administrative center of Dodola woreda.

History[edit]

Arnold Weinholt Hodson passed through Dodola when he was the British resident in southern Ethiopia (1914-1923).[1] The Italian Guida described Dodola in 1938 as a town with an important market in an area rich in resources of agriculture and forest, and having 150 inhabitants. The Guida further mentioned the village church of Kidane Mihret as a notable landmark.[2]

The road to Dodola built by the Italian occupants had fallen into disrepair by the time of the Bale revolt. However, a telephone landline to the town was in operation by 1964.[2]

The Ethiopian Ministry of Education gave permission on 21 March 1949 to a group of Danish missionaries to establish a station at Dodola, but due to funding issues the mission was not started until 1952. The mission included a school and a clinic. Over the following years the station had a constant problem with retaining staff, but by 1971 it had secured support from the Lutheran World Federation.[2]

Demographics[edit]

Based on figures from the Central Statistical Agency in 2005, Dodola has an estimated total population of 24,767 of whom 12,444 are men and 12,323 are women.[3] The 1994 national census reported this town had a total population of 13,847 of whom 6,749 were men and 7,098 were women.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Arnold Hodson, "Southern Abyssinia", Geographical Journal, 53 (1919), p. 73
  2. ^ a b c "Local History in Ethiopia" The Nordic Africa Institute website (accessed 29 November 2007)
  3. ^ CSA 2005 National Statistics, Table B.4