Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?

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"Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?"
Single by Chicago
from the album The Chicago Transit Authority
B-side "Listen"
Released October 1970
Format 7"
Recorded January 27/30, 1969
Genre Jazz fusion
Length 4:36 (album)
3:20 (single version)
2:54 (radio edit)
Label Columbia
Writer(s) Robert Lamm
Producer(s) James William Guercio
Chicago singles chronology
"25 or 6 to 4"
(1970)
"Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?"
(1970)
"Free"
(1971)

"Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?" is a song written and sung by Robert Lamm while in the rock band The Chicago Transit Authority (later shortened to "Chicago") and recorded for their eponymous debut album The Chicago Transit Authority in 1969.

The song was not released as a single until two tracks from the band's second album, "Make Me Smile" and "25 or 6 to 4", had become hits. It became the band's third straight Top 10 single, peaking at #7 in the U.S.[1]

The original uncut album version opens with a brief "free form" piano solo performed by Lamm. A spoken verse by Lamm is mixed into the sung final verse of the album version. The single version does not include the "free form" intro or the spoken verse, and was originally mixed in mono. A stereo re-edit (beginning from the point where the "free form" intro leaves off) was issued on the group's Only The Beginning greatest hits CD set.

A 2:54 shorter edit (without the opening fanfare or piano break, starting at the trumpet solo) was included on the original vinyl version of Chicago's Greatest Hits, but was not included on the CD version. This short edit was included on the CD version of the compilation album If You Leave Me Now This version was used an a radio edit version. A shorter version at 2:46 (starting mid-way through the trumpet solo) was issued as a promotional single, which finally appeared on 2007's The Best of Chicago: 40th Anniversary Edition.

A live version on the Chicago at Carnegie Hall box set presents an expanded version of the "free form" intro, which itself is given its own track.

The Promo Edit is the edit played on Certain Classic Hits stations and 70's radio shows Radio Station KKMJ would play the Promo Edit version on its Super Songs of the 70s weekend. Classic Hits KXBT would play the Promo Edit, and the True Oldies Channel would play the 3:20 single version.

Appearances in other media[edit]

  • In the 2000 movie Little Nicky, a recording of the song is played backwards on a record turntable and (fake) Satanic messages are heard.
  • The morning news show Morning Joe weaves this song into their program regularly.
  • The song is one of many Chicago songs played during the HBO movie Clear History, which features the band prominently in the story line.
  • The song is heard briefly in David O. Russell's 2013 film American Hustle.

Personnel[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Chicago Transit Authority Awards". Allmusic. Retrieved 2012-08-17. 

External links[edit]