Dog City

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Dog City
Dogcity.jpg
Dog City title screen
Also known as Jim Henson's Dog City
Format Animated
Puppetry
Written by Laraine Arkow, Terrie Collins, Marty Isenberg, Robert N. Skir, Robert Schechter, and Gary Sperling.[1]
Starring Muppet Performers:
Fran Brill
Lisa Buckley
Kevin Clash
Joey Mazzarino
Brian Muehl
David Rudman
Voices of Ron White
Elizabeth Hanna
Stuart Stone
John Stocker
James Rankin
Stephen Ouimette
Howard Jerome
Paulina Gillis
Country of origin Canada
No. of seasons 3
No. of episodes 31
Production
Executive producer(s) Michael K. Frith
Brian Henson
Patrick Loubert
Michael Hirsch
Clive A. Smith
Production company(s) Nelvana Limited
Jim Henson Productions
Broadcast
Original channel USA:
FOX (Fox Kids)[2]
Canada:
Teletoon
Original run September 26, 1992 – November 26, 1994

Dog City is a television series that was produced by Nelvana Limited and Jim Henson Productions and aired on FOX from September 26, 1992 to November 26, 1994 and in Canada on Teletoon until 2000. The show contained both animation by Nelvana, and puppetry by Jim Henson Productions. This was the first Jim Henson animated series since Muppet Babies and the animated Fraggle Rock.

TV movie[edit]

Dog City was originally a thirty nine minute long TV movie, broadcast in 1989 as an episode of The Jim Henson Hour, featuring the characters as puppets. In Dog City: The Movie, Ace Yu inherits a bar-restaurant called the Dog House following the death of his Uncle Harry and is harassed for protection money by crime syndicate boss Bugsy Them (who was responsible for the death of Uncle Harry). Refusing to pay or fight him, Bugsy kidnaps Ace's love interest Colleen. There are car chases and shoot-em-ups and rubber duckies involved in the action. In the end, Ace defeats Bugsy and gets the girl.[3]

Characters[edit]

  • Ace Yu (performed by Kevin Clash) - A German Shepherd adopted by Chinese Pekingese parents. Although Ace's puppet is a Hand-Rod Puppet, it is later modified into a Live-Hand Puppet when it was used to play Elliot in the TV series.
  • Bugsy Them (performed by Jim Henson) - A vain bulldog crime boss who is proud of his tail. His puppet is later used to play Bruno in the TV series.
    • Miss Belle (performed by Camille Bonora) - A poodle that is the key associate of Bugsy Them.
    • Mad Dog (performed by Steve Whitmire) - Bugsy Them's dimwitted St. Bernard henchman. His puppet is later used to play Bowser in the TV series.
    • Scruffy (performed by Gord Robertson) - Bugsy Them's henchman who is always scratching at his fleas.
    • Laughing Boy (performed by Rickey Boyd) - Bugsy Them's henchman who is always laughing and cracking jokes.
  • Mac (performed by Steve Whitmire) - The waiter at the Dog House. Although Steve Whitmire performed Mac in most scenes, Mac was performed by Rickey Boyd in scenes where Mac was sweeping.

Dog City: The Movie also features cameos by Sprocket the Dog from Fraggle Rock, Lyle the Dog and Baskerville the Hound from The Muppet Show, a dog character that resembles Tramp from Lady and the Tramp, and a background pug that later appears in Jim Henson's Animal Show, Puppet Up!, and other Henson Alternative projects.

The Muppets of Ace Yu and his associates would make cameos in The Muppets at Walt Disney World and would later go on to become Eliot Shag and the other "real world" counterparts to the animated characters.

Dog City: The Movie (sans the framing sequences) was released to regions 1 and 2.

The company's YouTube channel has 6 clips from the pilot in a playlist called "Dogs of Anarchy!".[4]

Plot[edit]

The animated portions of the show focused on a canine private investigator named Ace Hart. The Muppet portions of the show focused on the interactions between Ace Hart and his animator Eliot Shag (who, like Ace, is a German Shepherd). Eliot would illustrate the stories while Ace would go traverse through it, occasionally breaking the fourth wall to speak with Eliot about the various troubles with the story. In one episode, Eliot even enters Dog City himself to join Ace in solving a mystery.

A recurring gag was that many of the characters in the cartoon were seemingly based on the residents of Eliot's apartment building. The bulldog crime-boss Bugsy Vile was inspired by the building's grouchy bulldog superintendent Bruno. Ace's love interest Rosie was based on Eliot's unrequited feelings for his neighbor Colleen, and so on. The Muppet characters were unaware of this. In the first episode, Bruno asks Eliot how a loser like him could have created a great character like Bugsy. Eliot replies "Sometimes it's just staring you in the face".

Later series included segments from other shows Eliot worked on, including skits featuring the main Dog City characters and a superhero series starring the Batman parody Watchdog.

Characters[edit]

Animated[edit]

  • Bugsy Vile (voiced by John Stocker) - A bulldog who is the primary antagonist of the series. Bugsy Vile is a crime boss who is the "Dogfather of Crime."
    • Frisky (voiced by James Rankin) - A chihuahua who is Bugsy Vile's excitable henchman.
    • Mad Dog (voiced by Stephen Ouimette) - Bugsy Vile's psychotic mongrel henchman.
    • Bruiser (voiced by Howard Jerome) - Bruiser is Bugsy Vile's tough nephew and henchman.
    • Kitty (voiced by Paulina Gillis) - A female cat who serves as Bugsy's moll.
  • Mayor Kickbark (voiced by Stephen Ouimette) - The mayor of Dog City. He is always undermining Rosie O'Gravy.
    • Spunky the Flunky (voiced by John Stocker) - Mayor Kickbark's aide.
  • Dot (voiced by Tara Strong) - Rosie O'Gravy's cute and lovely niece. She often appears with Rosie in "The Adventures of Rosie and Dot" segments.
  • Steven (voiced by George Buza) - Steven was a canine watchman who was often seen in the animated segment with Yves.
  • Yves (voiced by Rino Romano) - A cat burglar who debuted in the third season. He would try to steal something only to get thwarted comically by Steven.
  • Sherlock Bones - An English bloodhound detective who was a rival to Ace until he was exposed as an art thief. His name is a spoof of Sherlock Holmes.
  • Woof Pack - A team of superhero dogs. The group was featured in comic vignettes, approaching mundane tasks like grocery shopping from a superheroic perspective.
    • Watch Dog - Watchdog is a superhero who is a parody of Batman where his name is take on Alan Moore's graphic novel Watchmen. Watch Dog carries hourglasses which act as gas canisters, and constantly uses time and clock related gadgets and metaphors. In "Who Watches the Watch Dog," Watch Dog's creator Fob Canine (a caricature of Bob Kane) posed as Watch Dog where he has his fellow comic book artist pose as the Labrador Gang in order to get Watch Dog to be popular again. Watch Dog is also the leader of the superhero group called the Woof Pack when the "Woof Pack" segments debuted in Season 3.
    • Plastic Lassie - A collie with the power of elasticity and member of the Woof Pack.
    • Pectoral Pooch - A dog with super-strength and member of the Woof Pack.
    • Hear Boy - A sound-sensitive superhero and member of the Woof Pack.
    • Wonder Whelp - The smallest, and youngest member of the Woof Pack.

Muppets[edit]

  • Eliot Shag (performed by Kevin Clash) - A German Shepherd who is the animator of Ace Hart's adventures. He often communicates with Ace Hart and would be interrupted by his girlfriend or Bruno.[5] In "Who Watches the Watch Dog," it is revealed that Elliot is a fan of a superhero called the Hooded Hound. Seeing as Eliot is a Live-Hand Muppet, Kevin Clash is assisted in operating Eliot by Don Reardon who operates Eliot's right hand.
  • Colleen Barker (performed by Fran Brill) - A collie who was Eliot's on-and-off girlfriend. She moved away from the apartment when the character was dropped by Season Two. She was the first inspiration for Rosie O'Gravy.
  • Terri Springer (performed by Fran Brill) - Terri Springer is an English Springer Spaniel who debuts in Season Two. She is Eliot's neighbor, Artie's mother, and a beautiful businesswoman. She served as the new inspiration for Rosie O'Gravy.
  • Artie Springer (performed by Joey Mazzarino) - An English Springer Spaniel, Artie Springer is Eliot's young friend and son of Terri Springer. His favorite squeaky toy, a yellow rabbit called Mr Mookie, eventually starred in its own cartoon. Artie's puppet was previously seen as a background character in the original special. He served as the inspiration for Eddie.
  • Ms. Fluffé (performed by Lisa Buckley) - A cat who is the landlady of the apartment that Eliot lives in. She served as the inspiration for Kitty.

List of episodes[edit]

Season 1 (1992-1993)[edit]

Ep# Title Airdate Synopsis
1 The Big Squeak September 26, 1992 Bugsy Vile steals all the squeaky toys in the hope of finding one that will unlock a millionaire's safe.
2 Taming of the Screw October 3, 1992 Ace Hart is persuaded to capture escaped lunatic Screwy Louie before Bugsy's gang can recruit him.
3 Meat the Butcher October 10, 1992 When Elliot's boss wants an Ace Hart adventure with violence, Elliot takes up Ace's advice and animates an episode where Ace is attacked by a psychopathic hitman named Meat the Butcher.
4 Disobedience School October 17, 1992 Bugsy takes over a school with the intent of corrupting young pups into robbing the bank. Unknown to him, all of his pupils (except Eddie) are cops in disguise.
5 The Dog Pound October 31, 1992 Ace Hart is sent to jail for stealing a priceless slipper and must prove his innocence.
6 Radio Dazed November 14, 1992 A series of suspicious accidents threaten to put Dog City's radio station off air.
7 The Bloodhound November 21, 1992 When Elliot gets suspicious of Colleen's new boyfriend, he animates an Ace Hart adventure where he tracks down a vampire called the Bloodhound.
8 Adventures in Puppysitting November 28, 1992 Bugsy recruits master thief Puppy-faced Felson who specialists in disguising himself as a baby so he can steal jewelery from wealthy heiresses.
9 Ya Gotta Have Hart December 19, 1992 When Elliot Shag and Ace object to Elliot's boss on the changes of the Ace Hart cartoons, both of them end up fired. In order to pay the rent, Elliot animates Ace into performing into different commercials, French films, and nursery rhymes.
10 In Your Dreams January 9, 1993 After a long hard day of drawing a new Ace Hart adventure, Elliot Shag falls asleep at his drawing table where he appears as a cartoon in Ace Hart's world.
11 Rocketship K-9 January 16, 1993 When Bruno is convinced that aliens are going to invade, Elliot Shag animates an Ace Hart cartoon where Ace has to save the moon from Bugsy Vile, Baron von Rottweiler, and a Russian cat agent named Bestov Breed.
12 Cats 'n' Dogs January 23, 1993 During Elliot's infestation of fleas, Bruno suspects that the cats are responsible causing Ms. Fluffé to fire him. This gives Elliot the idea of an Ace Hart cartoon where Bugsy Vile is in a gang war with the East Side Cats led by Claude Baddeley.
13 Is It Arf? January 30, 1993 Ace meets rival detective Sherlock Bones at the time when an art thief is at large.

Season 2 (1993)[edit]

Ep# Title Airdate Synopsis
14 Boss Bruiser September 18, 1993 When Bruno gets fired, the job of maintenance falls to Bowser. This inspires Elliot to animate an Ace Hart cartoon where Bruiser is put in charge of Bugsy Vile's gang.
15 Springer Fever September 25, 1993 Bugsy Vile throws Dog City into chaos by kidnapping the Mayor's secretary. Colleen dumps Elliot and he gets a new love interest: Artie's mum Terri.
16 Much Ado About Mad Dog October 2, 1993 Ace gains a new ally after saving Mad Dog from drowning. In this episode, it is revealed Mad Dog quotes Shakespeare when hit over the head. In the real world, Terri is approached by Colonel Claghound who wants to make a business deal with her.

NOTE: Colonel Claghound is a recycled version of Lyle the Dog from The Muppet Show.

17 Of Mutts and Mayors October 9, 1993 Bugsy cheats in the election and becomes mayor of Dog City. Ace and Rosie are fired from the police force and declared outlaws.
18 Who Watches the Watchdog? October 16, 1993 While Elliot repairs Artie's Bite-Man figure, it inspires him to make an Ace Hart cartoon where Ace accompanies Eddie to a comic convention where Bugsy Vile competes with the Labrador Gang to steal the 100 rarest comics.

NOTE: One of the guest at the comic book convention is called Stan Flea who is a homage to Stan Lee. There is also Mongrel Comics (a parody of Marvel Comics) which published the Whippet (who vaguely resembles Spirit, but whose costume and whip-like tail are a tribute to Indiana Jones) and Weiner Dog (a rubbery canine ala Plastic Man or Mister Fantastic).

19 The Great Dane Curse October 23, 1993 Ace Hart is hired to protect a wealthy heiress from assassins and her controlling father. Unknown to Ace, her boyfriend is Bruiser
20 Out of the Mouths of Pups October 30, 1993 Elliot's fans (including Artie) mail him ideas for new Ace Hart episodes, which he attempts to incorporate into his latest cartoon.
21 Farewell, My Rosie November 6, 1993 Rosie disappears on the same day as Ace's party. Ace discovers she was Bugsy Vile's prom date and nearly married Baron Von Rottweiler
22 Old Dogs, New Tricks November 13, 1993 Elliot Shag teams up with his old animation teacher Scratch McCollie in order to do an Ace Hart cartoon where Ace teams up with Sam Spayed.

NOTE: Scratch McCollie is a refurbished version of the Wolfhound from The Muppet Show.

23 Sick as a Dog November 20, 1993 When Elliot Shag is sick and is unable to make his deadline, his neighbors help to make an Ace Hart cartoon where they each take turns animating.

Season 3 (1994)[edit]

Ep# Title Airdate Synopsis
24 The New Litter September 17, 1994 Ace and Eddie visit Jurassic Park and Bugsy steals the secret chemical for cloning dinosaurs. Artie creates his own cartoon featuring the squeaky toy Mr. Mookie.
25 Doggy See, Doggy Do September 24, 1994 Ace pursues a criminal posing as a children's TV star. Artie gets bad grades in school and is grounded.
26 Comedy of Horrors October 1, 1994 Baron Von Rottweiler steals Eddie's brain and tries to force Rosie to marry his monster. An escaped lunatic resembling Bowser terrorizes Elliot, Artie and Bruno.

NOTE: This cartoon pays homage to several classic horror movies, including Frankenstein, Nosferatu, The Wolf Man, The Shining, Godzilla, Roger Corman's adaption of the Edgar Allan Poe series, and Friday the 13th

27 Howl the Conquering Hero October 8, 1994 Elliot helps Artie understand that a hero doesn't always have to be a superhero. This gives Elliot to animate an Ace Hart cartoon where Ace and Bugsy Vile compete for the Hero of the Year award.
28 Reduce, Re-Use, Retrieve November 5, 1994 Artie tries to get the other apartment residents to recycle. This gives Elliot the inspiration to animate an Ace Hart cartoon where Ace uncovers a plot by Baron von Rottweiler to take over the world by stealing the world's trees.

In the latest adventures of "The Adventures of Rosie and Dot," Rosie and Dot go camping in the same forest as Bugsy Vile's gang.

In "Yves 'n Steven," Yves plot to steal prized possessions is comically thwarted by Steven.

29 Future Schlock November 12, 1994 Baron Rottweiler builds a time machine and travels back to the 1600s where he uses squeaky toys to buy America from the Native American wolves.
30 No Pain, No Brain November 19, 1994 Bugsy and Ace compete in the Olympic games. Artie, Bruno and Bowser help Elliot get in shape for the Marathon.
31 Dog Days of Summer Vacation November 26, 1994

Cast[edit]

Muppet Performers[edit]

Voices[edit]

Additional voices[edit]

Credits[edit]

Season One[edit]

  • Executive Producers: Michael K. Frith, Brian Henson, Patrick Loubert, Michael Hirsh, Clive A. Smith
  • Produced by: Stephen Hodgins
  • Coordinating Producer: Patricia R. Burns
  • Line Producer: Hasmi Giakoumis
  • Associate Producer: Neil Court
  • Directed by: John Van Bruggen
  • Assistant Directors: Dave Pemberton, Steve Whitehouse
  • Story Editors: J.D. Smith, Peter Sauder
  • Voice Talent: Ron White, Elizabeth Hanna, Stuart Stone, John Stocker, James Rankin, Howard Jerome, Paulina Gillis, Stephen Oiumette
  • Casting and Voice Director: Jessie Thomson
  • Voice Coach: Kathryn Mullen
  • Unit Director: Brad Goodchild
  • Unit Manager: Kokila Jeffrey
  • Production Manager: Ruta Cube
  • Production Supervisor: Steve Chadwick
  • Coordinators: Jocelyn Hamilton (production), Erik Strobel (script), Shelly Theaker (storyboard), Tyler Baylis (design), Shelley Morrow (layout)
  • Storyboard Artists: Frank Lintzen, John Flagg, Arna Selznick, Andrew Tan, Vincenzo Natali, Bob Smith, Robert Rivard
  • Storyboard Cleanup Supervisor: Dave Quensnelle
  • Background Artist: Clive Powsey
  • Paint Supervisor: Mary Bertoia
  • Layout Artists: Dermot Walshe, Kevin Klis, Glenn Chadwick, Daniel Poitras, Gord McBride, Steve Remen, John Lei, Paul Bouchard, Brad Graham, Mike Halley
  • Layout Supervisor: Lyndon Ruddy
  • Color Designer: Jo-Anne Merrill
  • Designers: Charles E. Bastien, Jens Pindal, Leif Norheim, Kevin Fraser, Scott Bennett
  • Key Animators: Niall Johnston, Gerry Fournier, John De Klein, Paul Riley, Mike Tweedle, Scott Glynn, Dave Boudreau, Bill Zeats, Alan Knappett, Brad Goodchild, Lynn Reist, Dennis Gonzales
  • Post Production Supervisor: Rob Kirkpatrick
  • Post Production Manager: Lan Lamon
  • Supervising Sound Editor: Steve Cole
  • Picture Editor: Algis Maciulis
  • Supervising Pre-Production Editor: Darrell MacDonald
  • Supervising Breakdown Editor: Rick Dubiel
  • Recording and Transfer Technician: Mike Reid
  • Muppet Segments
  • Theme by: Philip Balsam
  • Score Composed by: Acrobat Music
  • Additional Production Facility: Hanho Heung Up Co. Ltd
  • Negative Cutting Services: Catherine Rankin Productions
  • Laboratories: Magnetic North, The Filmhouse Group, Access Post Production Audio Inc., Studio 306

Season Two[edit]

  • Executive Producers: Michael K. Frith, Brian Henson, Patrick Loubert, Michael Hirsh, Clive A. Smith
  • Supervising Producer: Stephen Hodgins
  • Coordinating Producer: Patrica R. Burns
  • Producer: Merle-Anne Ridley
  • Director: John Van Bruggen
  • Assistant Director: Dave Pemberton
  • Story Editor: J.D. Smith
  • Casting and Voice Director: Jessie Thomson
  • Voice Talent: Ron White, Elizabeth Hanna, Stuart Stone, John Stocker, James Rankin, Howard Jerome, Paulina Gillis, Stephen Ouimette
  • Production Supervisor: Steve Chadwick
  • Production Manager: Ruta Cube
  • Unit Director: Brad Goodchild
  • Coordinators: Asha Daniere (production), Erika Strobel (script), Laurie Towata (storyboard), Aidan Closs (layout), Patty Beausoleil (design)
  • Storyboard Artists: John Flagg, Frank Lintzen, Vincenzo Natali, Dave Pemberton, Robert Rivard, Arna Selznick, Bob Smith, Doug Thoms
  • Storyboard Cleanup Supervisor: Dave Thomas
  • Layout Supervisor: Tony Tarantini
  • Layout Artists: Dale Desrochers, Chad Hicks, Brian Lee, John Lei, Jeff Lyons, Mary Lyons, Chris Minz, Brian Poehlman, Affee Yepp
  • Color Design: Jo-Anne Merrill
  • Background Design: Clive Powsey
  • Design Supervisor: Doug Thoms
  • Designers: Dave Boudreau, Trevor Davies, Kevin Fraser, Stephanie Gignac, Steve Manning, Robert Walton, Richard Weston
  • Key Animators: Dave Boudreau, Robin Budd, Shane Doyle, Gerry Fournier, Brad Goodchild, John Hill, Niall Johnston, Rick Marshall, Lynn Reist, Cynthia Ward, Jamie Whitney, Steve Whitehouse
  • Paint Supervisor: Mary Bertoia
  • Supervising Editor: Rob Kirkpatrick
  • Post Production Managers: Marianne Culbert, Lan Lamon
  • Supervising Sound Editor: Steven Cole
  • Picture Editors: Algis Maciulis, Karen Lawrie
  • Supervising Pre-Production Editor: Darrell MacDonald
  • Supervising Breakdown Editor: Rick Dubiel
  • Recording/Transfer Technician: Mike Reid
  • Re-Recording Engineer: Tony Van den Akker
  • Muppet Segments
  • Theme Music by: Phil Balsam
  • Score Produced by: Acrobat Music
  • Additional Production Facilities: Hanho Heung Up Co. Ltd, Bardel Animation
  • Negative Cutting Services: Catherine Rankin Productions
  • Laboratories: Magnetic North, The Filmhouse Group, Access Post Production Audio, Inc., Studio 306
  • A Nelvana Production in association with Jim Henson Productions.
  • The Autonomous Stations of Spain and Canal (Spain).

Season Three[edit]

  • Executive Producers: Michael K. Frith, Brian Henson, Patrick Loubert, Michael Hirsh, Clive A. Smith
  • Supervising Producer: Stephen Hodgins
  • Coordinating Producer: Patricia R. Burns
  • Producer: Marianne Culbert
  • Director: David Pemberton
  • Assistant Director: John Flagg
  • Story Editor: J.D. Smith
  • Casting and Voice Director: Jessie Thomson
  • Voice Talent: Ron White, Elizabeth Hanna, Stuart Stone, John Stocker, James Rankin, Howard Jerome, Paulina Gillis, Stephen Ouimette, Rino Romano, George Buza
  • Production Supervisor: Steve Chadwick
  • Unit Director: Michael Eames
  • Coordinators: Patricia Drury (production), Erika Strobel (script), Don Lauder (storyboard), Carolyn Walters (design)
  • Storyboard Artists: Robert Walton, Dave Thomas, Lyndon Ruddy, Robert Rivard, Vincenzo Natali, Arna Selznick, Keith Ingham
  • Layout Supervisor: Genni Selby
  • Layout Artists: Ted Collyer, Fred Wilmot, Blayne Burnside, Rob Sadler, Kevin Klis, Terry Rotsaert, Ron Wilson, Frank Ramirez, Steve Remen
  • Colour Design: Karyn Booth-Chadwick
  • Background Design: Mike Hitchcox
  • Design Supervisor: Doug Thoms
  • Designers: Edward Lee, Brad Coombs, Didier Loubat, Robert Davies, Richard Weston
  • Posers: Niall Johnston, Lynn Reist, Maureen Shelleau
  • Paint Supervisor: Mary Bertoia
  • Supervising Editor: Rob Kirkpatrick
  • Post Production Managers: Ruth Pond, Lan Lamon
  • Supervising Sound Editor: Steven Cole
  • Picture Editor: Algis Maciulis
  • Supervising Pre-Production Editor: Darrell MacDonald
  • Supervising Breakdown Editor: Rick Dubiel
  • Recording/Transfer Technician: Sheila Murray
  • Re-Recording Engineer: Tony Van den Akker
  • Muppet Segments
  • Theme Music by: Phil Balsam
  • Score Produced by: Acrobat Music
  • Additional Production Facilities: Hanho Heung Up Co., Ltd
  • Negative Cutting Services: Catherine Rankin Productions
  • A Nelvana Production in association with Jim Henson Productions
  • The Autonomous Stations of Spain and Canal (Spain).

Reception[edit]

Dog City received generally positive reviews from critics, holding a 7.6 on IMDb. Fans, meanwhile, liked the idea of a cartoon conversing with his animator and the parallels between the cartoon and the "real" world.

Video releases[edit]

Two VHS tapes with two episodes each were released by Sony Wonder. Much Ado About Mad Dog contains the episodes Much Ado About Mad Dog and Old Dogs, New Tricks. The Big Squeak contains the episodes The Big Squeak and Boss Bruiser. Another tape, Disobedience School was released in the UK through Channel 4 and contains the episodes Disobedience School, The Dog Pound, and Radio Daze.

Dog City: The Movie was released to UK exclusive region 2 DVD, and a Region 1 DVD was released on June 8, 2010, though the series has not had any DVD release. Most episodes of all three seasons are available from Amazon Video on Demand.

International Broadcast[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Erickson, Hal (1993). Television Cartoon Shows An Illustrated Encyclopedia 1949-1993. McFarland and Company Inc., Publishers. ISBN 0-7864-0029-3. 
  2. ^ Stevens, Mary (February 5, 1993). "It's Not Easy Being A Henson". The Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 2012-03-17. 
  3. ^ "Jim Henson's Dog City: The Movie". DVD Talk. Retrieved 2012-03-17. 
  4. ^ Dogs of Anarchy
  5. ^ Erickson, Hal (1993). Television Cartoon Shows An Illustrated Encyclopedia 1949-1993. McFarland and Company Inc., Publishers. ISBN 0-7864-0029-3. 
  6. ^ [1]
  7. ^ Entry at fernsehserien.de

External links[edit]