Dolphin Computer Access

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Dolphin Computer Access is a British company that designs, creates and sells software for people who are blind or have vision and print impairments, dyslexia and other specific learning difficulties. The company was set up in 1986 and now has offices in the United Kingdom, United States, Sweden and Norway.[1] Through the use of Dolphin's screen enlargers, screen readers and braille output, users can operate word processors, spreadsheets, databases and the internet.[2] The company's customers include Microsoft, the Inland Revenue, the BBC, the Royal Air Force and Vodafone.[3]

Dolphin's product SuperNova has won the UK WOW! award for technology in education.[4]

In 2005 Dolphin worked alongside BT and the National Library for the Blind to develop a prototype synthetic voice application enabling books, magazines and newspapers to be converted into audio format, thus enabling them to be read by visually impaired computer users.[5]

In 2008 the company announced a merger with Durham based Software Express Distribution Limited, a software development company and producer of Guide, a software package which enables visually impaired users to access Windows.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Dolphin Computer Access Announce Their Acquisition of Software Express Distribution". International Business Times. 16 November 2008. Retrieved 28 January 2010. 
  2. ^ Coughlan, Sean (6 July 2001). "A touch of high-tech genius". Times Educational Supplement. Retrieved 28 January 2010. 
  3. ^ "World market awaits company". The Northern Echo. 25 November 2008. Retrieved 28 January 2010. 
  4. ^ "Latest technology". Insight Visions Ahead. 2008. Retrieved 28 January 2010. 
  5. ^ "Talking technology to offer new reading matter to thousands". sourcewire.com. 16 March 2005. Retrieved 28 January 2010. 

External links[edit]