Domlur

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Domlur
ಡೊಮ್ಮಲೂರು
neighbourhood
Domlur is located in Bengaluru
Domlur
Domlur
Location in Bengaluru, India
Coordinates: 12°57′39″N 77°38′10″E / 12.9608157°N 77.6361322°E / 12.9608157; 77.6361322Coordinates: 12°57′39″N 77°38′10″E / 12.9608157°N 77.6361322°E / 12.9608157; 77.6361322
Country  India
State Karnataka
District Bangalore Urban
Metro Bengaluru
Languages
 • Official Kannada
Time zone IST (UTC+5:30)
PIN 560071
Vidhan Sabha constituency Shantinagar

Domlur (Kannada: ದೊಮ್ಮಲೂರು) is a small township located in the eastern part of Bangalore city in India. Domulur was included in the erstwhile Bangalore Civil and Military Station[1] under the British Madras Presidency till it was transferred to the Mysore State in 1949.[2]

Earlier it was known as Bhagat Singh Nagar,[citation needed] but for unknown reasons, it is now known as Domlur. There is a debate[according to whom?] over the exact meaning of the term 'Domlur'. This is further supported by the inscriptions found in Chokkanathaswamy temple in Domlur, which is believed to be constructed by Cholas. [1]. Domlur is surrounded by offices of multinational software companies and business process outsourcing companies. Software park Embassy Golf Links (EGL) located at Domlur adds a beauty to this place. NetApp, Dell, IBM, Microsoft, ANZ, Yahoo, Target and Mistral Solutions are the companies located in this area. Domlur is located close to the 'old airport'.

The major military establishments having divisions in Domlur are Indian Air Force, EME Workshop, and ASC (Army Service Corps).

Ancient Tamil Inscriptions[edit]

The Chokkanathaswamy Temple is a 10th-century Chola temple, located in Domlur. There are a number of Tamil inscriptions in the temple. Domlur is called as Tombalur or Desimanikkapattanam in these inscriptions. Chakravarthi Posalaviraramanatha Deva has left inscriptions with directions to temple authorities of his kingdom. Further some inscriptions record the tributes, taxes and tolls made to the temple by Devaraya II of Vijayanagar Empire, which state the houses, wells, land around Tombalur were offered to the deity Sokkapperumal. Another Tamil inscription dated 1270 talks about 2 door posts being donated by Alagiyar. Yet another inscription in Tamil details Talaikkattu and his wife donating lands from Jalapalli village and Vinnamangalam tank to the deity. A 1290AD inscription talks about donation of ten pens from the revenue of Tommalur by Poysala vira Ramananda.[1][3][4][5][6][7][8]

Old Airport road flyover[edit]

A major landmark in Domlur is the Airport road flyover on Old Airport road and Inner ring road junction. This flyover was notorious for its delay in construction and the traffic trouble caused by its delay which was due to the mismanagement by the subcontractor UPSBC ( Uttar Pradesh State Bridge Corporation) [2]. The construction of the flyover which was started in early 2003 ended in 2007. The flyover, excluding the outer loops, was completed in July 2006 and opened to public on July 12, 2006 [3]. Subsequently, the other loops were opened to public in the next 8 months.

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Rice, Benjamin Lewis (1887). Mysore: A Gazetteer Compiled for Government. London, UK: Asian Educational Services. p. 70. ISBN 8120609778. Retrieved 17 January 2015. 
  2. ^ Srivatsa, Sharath S (31 October 2007). "Bangalore calling: it all goes way back…" (Bangalore). The Hindu. Retrieved 3 January 2015. 
  3. ^ Githa, U B (19 April 2004). "A Chola temple in Domlur!" (Bangalore). Deccan Herald. Retrieved 4 January 2015. 
  4. ^ Githa, U B. "Chokkanathaswamy Temple, a fine example of Chola architecture". Chitralakshana: All about Indian Art. Retrieved 17 January 2015. 
  5. ^ Sridhar, Lakshminarasimhan; Sridhar, Geetha. "Chokkanarayan Swamy Temple Domlur". Vishnu Temples of Karnataka. Retrieved 16 January 2015. 
  6. ^ Rao, Priyanka S (19 May 2012). "Chokkanatha: The city’s oldest temple" (Bangalore). The New Indian Express. Retrieved 18 January 2015. 
  7. ^ Harshitha, Samyuktha (10 December 2012). "The temple of the Cholas". Suttha Muttha. Retrieved 25 January 2015. 
  8. ^ Rizvi, Aliyeh (20 October 2014). "Good vibrations" (Bangalore). Bangalore Mirror. Bangalore Mirror Bureau. Retrieved 6 February 2015.