Don Beddoe

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Don Beddoe
Born Donald T. Beddoe
(1903-07-01)July 1, 1903
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
Died January 19, 1991(1991-01-19) (aged 87)
Laguna Hills, California, U.S
Occupation Film, television actor
Years active 1937–1984
Spouse(s) Joyce Mathews (1974–1991, his death)
Evelyn Beddoe (1943–1974,(her death)

Don T. Beddoe (July 1, 1903 – January 19, 1991) was an American character actor.

Career[edit]

Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Beddoe made his Broadway acting debut in 1929, receiving top billing (over a young Spencer Tracy) in Nigger Rich.[1]

After a decade of stage work and bit parts in films, Beddoe began more prominent film roles in the late 1930s. He was usually cast as fast-talking reporters and the like. His commercial acting career was put on hold when he served in World War II in the United States Army Air Corps, in which he performed in the Air Force play, Winged Victory.

Beddoe subsequently returned to films playing small character roles. He occasionally appeared in comedy shorts playing comic foils, such as the Three Stooges shorts Three Sappy People and You Nazty Spy!. Beddoe appeared in over 180 films and dozens of television programs. In the 1950s and 1960s Beddoe made four appearances on Have Gun – Will Travel, three times on Lawman, three on Maverick, three on Laramie, three on Lassie, and three on Perry Mason. He was also cast on the western aviation series, Sky King, with Kirby Grant, on the ABC/Warner Brothers series, The Alaskans, with Roger Moore, on the ABC adventure series, Straightaway, with Brian Kelly and John Ashley, and on the NBC western series, The Tall Man, with Barry Sullivan and Clu Gulager. He appeared too on the CBS sitcom, Pete and Gladys, with Harry Morgan and Cara Williams, and on the ABC drama series, Going My Way, with Gene Kelly. He guest starred as well on David Janssen's first series, the crime drama, Richard Diamond, Private Detective. He also made appearances on episodes of the Lone Ranger in the '50s.

During the 1970–1971 season of ABC's Nanny and the Professor, Beddoe made four appearances, three as Mr. Thatcher. In 1984, he made his final television appearance as Kris in NBC's Highway to Heaven starring Michael Landon.

Death[edit]

Beddoe died of natural causes on January 19, 1991 at age 87.

Selected filmography[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]