Don Kenyon

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Don Kenyon
Personal information
Full name Donald Kenyon
Born (1924-05-15)15 May 1924
Wordsley, Staffordshire, England
Died 12 November 1996(1996-11-12) (aged 72)
Worcester, England
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium
International information
National side
Career statistics
Competition Tests First-class
Matches 8 643
Runs scored 192 37002
Batting average 12.80 33.63
100s/50s –/1 74/180
Top score 87 259
Balls bowled 206
Wickets 1
Bowling average 187.00
5 wickets in innings
10 wickets in match
Best bowling 1/8
Catches/stumpings 5/– 326/–
Source: [1]

Donald Kenyon (15 May 1924[1] – 12 November 1996) was an English cricketer, who played in eight Tests for England from 1951 to 1955. He captained Worcestershire between 1959 and 1967.

Cricket writer, Colin Bateman, noted, "A polished batsman who relished taking on fast bowlers, he became the heaviest scorer in Worcestershire's history with more than 37,000 first class runs to his credit".[1]

Life and career[edit]

Kenyon was born in Wordsley, Staffordshire.[1] He played all his county cricket for Worcestershire, but when international opportunities came along, Kenyon was unable to produce his run-making abilities on the highest stage. He fell in single figures in eleven of his fifteen England innings, although his Test career was rather sporadic in nature. Kenyon played three Tests on the 1951/52 tour to India, two more in 1953, with three more appearances in 1955, but life in the fast lane did not seem to suit his temperament.[1]

He was a popular and successful captain of his county, and went on in his later life to become an England Test selector, and president of his beloved county side.[1]

Kenyon died in November 1996, in Worcester, at the age of 72.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Bateman, Colin (1993). If The Cap Fits. Tony Williams Publications. p. 101. ISBN 1-869833-21-X. 
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Peter Richardson
Worcestershire County Cricket Captain
1959–1967
Succeeded by
Tom Graveney