Donald Antrim

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Donald Antrim (born 1958) is an American novelist. His first novel, Elect Mr. Robinson for a Better World, was published in 1993. In 1999 The New Yorker named him as among the twenty best writers under the age of forty.[1] In 2013, he was named a MacArthur Fellow.[2]

Antrim is a frequent contributor of fiction to The New Yorker and has written a number of critically acclaimed novels, including The Verificationist and The Hundred Brothers, which was a finalist for the 1998 PEN/Faulkner Award in fiction.[3] "He's written three novels that could all be labeled as short, comic works of surrealism, a description that utterly fails to capture how unusual and wonderful and beautiful they are."[4]

He is also the author of The Afterlife, a 2006 memoir about his mother, Louanne Self.[5] He has received grants and awards from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library. In 2013, he received a fellowship from the MacArthur Foundation, a so-called Genius Grant.[6]

Antrim is the brother of the artist Terry Leness and the son of Harry Antrim, a scholar of T. S. Eliot. He graduated from Brown University in 1981.

He has taught prose fiction at the graduate school of New York University and was the Mary Ellen von der Heyden Fellow for Fiction at the American Academy in Berlin, Germany, for spring 2009. Antrim teaches in the MFA program at Columbia University. He lives in Brooklyn.


Bibliography[edit]

Novels

Short stories

  • "Y Chromosome" (New Yorker, November 18, 1996)
  • “An Actor Prepares” (New Yorker, June 21, 1999)
  • “The Pancake Supper" (New Yorker, December 7, 1999)
  • “Pond, with Mud” (New Yorker, October 20, 2003)
  • “Church” (New Yorker, December 22, 2003)
  • “Solace” (New Yorker, April 4, 2005)
  • “Another Manhattan” (New Yorker, December 22, 2008) [7]
  • “He Knew” (New Yorker, May 9, 2011)
  • “Ever Since” (New Yorker, March 12, 2012)
  • "Fed" (New Yorker, November 4, 2013)[8]
  • “The Emerald Light in the Air” (New Yorker, February 3, 2014)[9]

Non-fiction

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 'New Yorker' Publishes 'Under 40' Fiction List - 6/14/1999 - Publishers Weekly.
  2. ^ List of 2013 'Genius Grant' recipients
  3. ^ "Past Winners & Finalists". Pen/Faulkner Foundation. Retrieved February 12, 2014. 
  4. ^ Smith, Drew (February 2014). "Donald Antrim". The Believer. Retrieved February 18, 2014. 
  5. ^ Scott, A.O. (June 18, 2006). "Son & Survivor". New York Times Review of Books. Retrieved February 12, 2014. 
  6. ^ Treisman, Rebecca (September 25, 2013). "Congratulations, Donald Antrim". The New Yorker. Retrieved February 12, 2014. 
  7. ^ Antrim, Donald (December 22, 2008). "Another Manhattan". The New Yorker. Retrieved May 24, 2014. 
  8. ^ Antrim, Donald (November 4, 2013). "Fed". The New Yorker. Retrieved May 24, 2014. 
  9. ^ Antrim, Donald (February 3, 2014). "The Emerald Light in the Air". The New Yorker. Retrieved May 24, 2014. 
  10. ^ Antrim, Donald (December 25, 2000). "Black Mountain, 1977". The New Yorker. Retrieved February 18, 2014. 
  11. ^ Antrim, Donald (June 17, 2002). "I Bought A Bed". The New Yorker. Retrieved February 18, 2014. 
  12. ^ Antrim, Donald (February 17, 2003). "AKA Sam". The New Yorker. Retrieved February 18, 2014. 
  13. ^ Antrim, Donald (April 21, 2003). "Ad Nauseam". The New Yorker. Retrieved February 18, 2014. 
  14. ^ Antrim, Donald (December 22, 2003). "Church". The New Yorker. Retrieved February 18, 2014. 
  15. ^ Antrim, Donald (March 15, 2004). "The Kimono". The New Yorker. Retrieved February 18, 2014. 
  16. ^ Antrim, Donald (September 3, 2007). "A Man In The Kitchen". The New Yorker. Retrieved February 18, 2014. 

External links[edit]