Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble!

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Donkey Kong Country 3:
Dixie Kong's Double Trouble!
Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble!
North American SNES box art
Developer(s) Rare
Publisher(s) Nintendo
Director(s) Tim Stamper
Producer(s) Andrew Collard
Designer(s) Andrew Collard
Paul Weaver
Artist(s) Mark Stevenson
Neil Crook
Composer(s) Eveline Fischer
David Wise
Series Donkey Kong Country,
Donkey Kong
Platform(s) SNES
Game Boy Advance
Virtual Console
Release date(s)
Genre(s) Platformer
Mode(s) Single-player, multiplayer
Distribution Cartridge, download

Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble!, known in Japan as Super Donkey Kong 3: The Mysterious Kremis Island (スーパードンキーコング3 謎のクレミス島 Sūpā Donkī Kongu Surī: Nazo no Kuremisu Shima?), commonly abbreviated to DKC3, is a 1996 platforming video game developed by Rare and published by Nintendo for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System. The game was the final instalment in the Donkey Kong Country series until Nintendo announced Retro Studios would be reviving the series and developing the next instalment, Donkey Kong Country Returns, for the Wii. Donkey Kong Country 3 was released in late 1996 in North America, Europe and Japan. The game was ported to the Game Boy Advance in 2005 with a different soundtrack and added features. The game was released on the Wii's Virtual Console service in North America on 24 December 2007 (unavailable from 16 November 2012 until 26 February 2015), and the following day in Europe as a special Christmas update (was unavailable in Europe from 25 November 2012[1] until 30 October 2014) as well as for Wii U on 30 October 2014 in Europe, on 26 November in Japan, and in North America on 26 February 2015.[2][3][4]

Gameplay[edit]

Dixie Kong and Kiddy Kong in the level "Riverside Race", present in the second world.

Donkey Kong Country 3 is a platform game where players control Dixie Kong and her cousin Kiddy Kong through 48 levels. Many of the gameplay elements from previous games in the series see a return in this game, such as barrels, bonus levels which reward the player with special "bonus coins," DK coins, animal helpers and co-operative play. Both of the two playable Kongs have unique abilities, such as Dixie's ability to slow her descent by spinning her pony-tail, and Kiddy's ability to bounce across open water. The Kongs can also throw each other around levels to break cracked floors, hit switches or reach secret areas.

Levels in Donkey Kong Country 3 include a mixture of straight platforming, swimming and on-rails levels. They are based around several returning themes including forests, cliff-sides, factories and mountain tops, and a host of new themes, such as a pier and inside a mill. The level design is more diverse compared to its predecessors, with more complex puzzles and obstacles. For instance, in one level, Riverside Race, players are followed by a swarm of bees which can instantly kill them and must race to the end of the level against the clock. Replacing Banana Coins are Bear Coins, which are often found along the path of the level; they are also used as currency in the game. Every level has an enemy called a Koin; each of these enemies bears the DK Coin of their respective level, holding it as a shield. As these enemies always face towards the Kongs, they must be defeated by throwing a steel keg over them so it bounces off a wall behind them so it can strike them from behind.[5][6] The game overworld is also more complex, allowing players to explore between each area instead of forcing them along a linear path. The game includes several vehicles such as a motorboat and hovercraft which can be used to traverse the overworld.[7]

Several animal helpers return from previous games, including Enguarde the swordfish and Squitter the Spider. New helpers include Ellie the Elephant, who can suck up water in her trunk to spray enemies with, and Parry the Parallel Bird who flies directly above the players character and can be used to collect out-of-reach items. As in the previous game, players can directly control animals instead of just riding them.

Scattered around the Northern Kremisphere overworld are the Brothers Bear, a family of bears which provide the players with hints, key items or other services. Players can collect items in levels to trade with the Bears for other items or to help progress to later levels; one such kind of item is the Bear Coin, which functions very similarly to Banana Coins from the last game as a medium of exchange found in levels. Other members from the Kong family, such as Cranky Kong, Wrinkly Kong, Swanky Kong and Funky Kong can also be found around the overworld.

Plot[edit]

Characters[edit]

Further information: List of Donkey Kong characters

The player characters in this game are Dixie Kong, who is Diddy Kong's girlfriend,[8] and her younger cousin Kiddy Kong.[9][10][11]

Donkey Kong Country 3 sees the return of several characters from the previous games, but although neither Donkey Kong nor Diddy Kong makes a major appearance in the game, their kidnapping is the impetus of the story. Scattered about the overworld are various other characters: Wrinkly Kong appears in "save caves," which when entered let the player save their game;[12] Funky Kong plays a key role in the game, as he supplies the player with vehicles to traverse the overworld; Swanky Kong, reappearing from Donkey Kong Country 2, lets players challenge Cranky Kong to a contest involving throwing balls at targets in exchange for Bear Coins; lastly, new to the series are the Brothers Bear, thirteen bears providing the player with services in exchange for Bear Coins, some of whom are instrumental for advancing through the game, such as Boomer. The main antagonist of the previous games, King K. Rool, reappears under the moniker of Baron K. Roolenstein. To defeat him in this game, the Kongs must rescue mysterious creatures called Banana Birds, which can be taken to Wrinkly's Save Cave for shelter.

Story[edit]

Sometime after the events of Donkey Kong Country 2, Donkey Kong and Diddy Kong suddenly disappear in the Northern Kremisphere,[13][14] which bears a geographical resemblance to Canada and Northern Europe.[15] Dixie Kong sets off to find the pair and is joined by her cousin Kiddy Kong, aided by Funky Kong's vehicles to traverse the land. They reach Kastle KAOS, the lair of a mysterious robot named KAOS, who was thought to be the new leader of the Kremlings.[16] After they destroy KAOS, the curtain in the background rolls up to reveal the robot was being controlled by Baron K. Roolenstein, the new moniker of King K. Rool. After the duo fights him, Donkey and Diddy pop out of the destroyed KAOS, implying they were being used to power the robot.[17]

Dixie and Kiddy uncover the legendary, extinct volcanic island of Krematoa (whose name is a play on Krakatoa). They meet Boomer, an exiled member of the Brothers Bear,[18] inside his bomb shelter. He agrees to blow up the rocks hindering the path in exchange for bonus coins. After Dixie and Kiddy find all bonus coins and five cogwheels hidden in Krematoa, the duo gives the cogs to Boomer, who puts them into a machine[19] which reactivates Krematoa, revealing Knautilus, K. Roolenstein's personal submarine. The Kongs board the submarine and do battle against him in there, but he escapes once again.

Once the Kongs collect all DK coins, they give the coins to Funky, who in exchange gives them a gyrocopter.[20] The duo then finds a mysterious creature called the Banana Bird Queen, who is bound to a barrier cast by K. Roolenstein.[21] She tells the Kongs that she can only be freed if her separated children are returned to her, and that she will rid the land of K. Rool if she is freed.[22] The Kongs find each of her children in a cave, where one of the birds is trapped in an egg which hatches when the Kongs complete a Simon-like memory game. After rescuing them and completing a large trade sequence between the Brothers Bear,[23] the Kongs return the children to the Queen. The Queen and her children all sing, annihilating the barrier. The Queen proceeds to chase K. Rool, who is fleeing in a hovercraft. When she catches up to him, she drops a giant eggshell on top of him, which Dixie and Kiddy land on. The Kongs repeatedly knock on the shell, annoying K. Rool.

Development and release[edit]

Donkey Kong Country 3 was developed by Rareware and published by Nintendo, just like the last two games. Tim Stamper retook the role as director.

While the game sold over a million units worldwide, it has been believed that its sales were hurt by its November 1996 release, which was when the Nintendo 64 console had the majority of industry's attention.[24]

GBA port[edit]

As with the past two Donkey Kong Country games, a Game Boy Advance port was developed by Rare. The title omits the original's subtitle "Dixie Kong's Double Trouble!". Amongst the changes is Pacifica, a bonus world exclusive to the GBA version of the game, accessible halfway through. With Pacifica put into the game, the boss known as Barbos was moved there, and in its original place was a whole new boss, Kroctopus. The port also featured a new cheat menu and an all-new soundtrack composed by David Wise[25][26] from the ground up, which replaced the original; however, Tim Stamper stated that he wanted to include both the original and the new soundtrack on the GBA version, but was limited by the small cartridge space.[27] GameSpot said in their review that the music was in some cases better than the original, such as the boardwalk levels of Lake Orangatanga.[28] The port also had a number of minor changes, including a brighter screen, around the time when the Game Boy Advance SP had the backlight refitted. Wrinkly Kong's save caves are also omitted; the first one was replaced by Wrinkly's retreat and the rest are replaced by Cranky's Dojo. Swanky's bonus games now feature a virtual reality where the player must collect stars. Some of the Brothers Bear locations and items were altered as well. This is also a side effect of Pacifica's addition, as an extra bear location was added.

Soundtrack[edit]

The soundtrack was composed by Eveline Fischer and David Wise, with Fischer producing most of the game's music.[25]

Reception[edit]

Reception
Aggregate scores
Aggregator Score
GameRankings 85%[29] (SNES)
75%[36] (GBA)
Review scores
Publication Score
Electronic Gaming Monthly 8.12 of 10[29] (SNES)
Game Informer 9 of 10[29] (SNES)
8.5 of 10[30] (GBA)
GamePro 3/5 stars[34] (GBA)
GameSpot 7.8 of 10 [28] (GBA)
GameSpy 4/5 stars[33] (GBA)
IGN 8.5 of 10[31] (SNES)
7.5 of 10[32] (GBA)
Nintendo Power 8 of 10[30] (GBA)
Play Magazine 9 of 10[30] (GBA)
Yahoo! Games 4/5 stars[35](GBA)

The game went on to sell 2.89 million copies worldwide, with 1.7 million copies sold in Japan and 1.12 million copies sold in the United States.[39][40] It was rated at 86% positive for SNES and a 75% for Game Boy Advance on GameRankings, the lowest of the five Donkey Kong Country games. Sales of the game were also hurt by the release of the Nintendo 64 console, which came out only months before, but the game was still a commercial success.


References[edit]

  1. ^ "Nintendo Life, "Donkey Kong Country Trilogy To Be Pulled From Wii Virtual Console"". 
  2. ^ "Donkey Kong Country 3 on nintendo.co.uk". 
  3. ^ "Super Donkey Kong 3". 
  4. ^ "Nintendo Download: 26th February (North America)". 
  5. ^ "IGN, Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble! - DK Coin FAQ". 
  6. ^ "Super Donkey Kong 3". 
  7. ^ "Kotaku, "The Best Donkey Kong Country Ever Made"". 
  8. ^ "Nintendo Life: "Donkey Kong Country 2 Review" Wii U". 
  9. ^ Rareware (22 November 1996). "Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble!". Super Nintendo Entertainment System. Nintendo. Level/area: Funky's Rentals. "Funky Kong: Yo, Dixie, what's happening? I've set up my smokin' new boat shop on this island. But that's not all...I've also brought your excellent cousin Kiddy Kong along for the ride!"
  10. ^ "Nintendo Life: "Donkey Kong Country 3 Review" Wii U". 
  11. ^ Thomas, Lucas (4 January 2008). "IGN: Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble Review". IGN.com. Retrieved 6 October 2009. 
  12. ^ "Youtube: DKC3 (SNES) (103%) / 5-2. Wrinkly's Save Cave [K3].". 
  13. ^ Donkey Kong Country 3 manual, page 4.
  14. ^ Thomas, Lucas (4 January 2008). "IGN: Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble Review". IGN.com. Retrieved 6 October 2009. 
  15. ^ "Kotaku, "The Best Donkey Kong Country Ever Made"". 
  16. ^ Donkey Kong Country 3 manual, page 5.
  17. ^ Rareware (22 November 1996). "Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble!". Super Nintendo Entertainment System. Nintendo. Level/area: Kastle Kaos. "Donkey Kong: My head... what happened... One minute I was dreaming about the world's biggest pile of bananas...the next I was a power crazed madman! / Diddy Kong: Hey, don't worry, Donkey... Thanks to Dixie, it's all over!"
  18. ^ Rareware (22 November 1996). "Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble!". Super Nintendo Entertainment System. Nintendo. Level/area: Boomer's Bomb Shelter. "Boomer: Hello! Boomer's the name, blowing things up is my game. The rest of the folks have stuck me up in here."
  19. ^ Rareware (22 November 1996). "Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble!". Super Nintendo Entertainment System. Nintendo. Level/area: Boomer's Bomb Shelter. "Boomer: Hey there, Kongs, what have you found on your travels? You know, I reckon those cogs will fit onto this machine!"
  20. ^ Rareware (22 November 1996). "Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble!". Super Nintendo Entertainment System. Nintendo. Level/area: Funky's Rentals. "Funky Kong: Unbelievable type of a situation! You've found all of the DK coins! ... May I introduce you to my finest and coolest creation yet, the Funky-Copter!"
  21. ^ Rareware (22 November 1996). "Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble!". Super Nintendo Entertainment System. Nintendo. Level/area: Upper-left corner of the overworld map. "Banana Bird Queen: That yellow rotten belly K. Rool imprisoned me behind this evil barrier, which he sealed with a dark and powerful magic spell."
  22. ^ Rareware (22 November 1996). "Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble!". Super Nintendo Entertainment System. Nintendo. Level/area: Upper-left corner of the overworld map. "Banana Bird Queen: ...He commanded a bunch of his wicked Kremlings to hide the only ones that could split the crystal key — my poor children. Only all of them together have the power to break the spell...find all of my children and bring them back to me...In return I promise to rid this land of K. Rool forever."
  23. ^ "Nintendo Life: Donkey Kong Country 3 review.". 
  24. ^ Thomas, Lucas (4 January 2008). "IGN: Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble Review". IGN.com. Retrieved 6 October 2009. 
  25. ^ a b Rareware.com: Scribes – February 9, 2006 at Internet Archive [David Wise composed "Dixie Beat", "Crazy Calypso", "Wrinkly's Save Cave", "Get Fit A-Go-Go", "Wrinkly 64", "Brothers Bear", and "Bonus Time" (along with "Bonus Win" and "Bonus Lose"); and Eveline Fischer composed the rest of the soundtrack.]
  26. ^ "Donkey Kong Country 3, for Game Boy Advance". Moby Games. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  27. ^ "DK Vine: Stamped Out!". 
  28. ^ a b Provo, Frank (14 November 2005). "Donkey Kong Country 3 Review for Game Boy Advance - GameSpot". GameSpot. Retrieved 10 October 2009. 
  29. ^ a b c "Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble for SNES - GameRankings". Game Rankings. Retrieved 6 October 2009. 
  30. ^ a b c "Donkey Kong Country 3 Reviews and Articles for Game Boy Advance - GameRankings". Game Rankings. Retrieved 6 October 2009. 
  31. ^ Thomas, Lucas (4 January 2008). "IGN: Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble Review". IGN.com. Retrieved 6 October 2009. 
  32. ^ Harris, Criag (8 November 2008). "IGN: Donkey Kong Country 3 Review". IGN.com. Retrieved 6 October 2009. 
  33. ^ Stratton, Bryan (10 November 2005). "GameSpy: Donkey Kong Country 3". GameSpy. pp. 1–2. Retrieved 6 October 2009. 
  34. ^ Burner, Rice (7 October 2005). "Review : Donkey Kong Country 3 (Game Boy Advance) - from GamePro.com". GamePro. Archived from the original on 6 December 2008. Retrieved 6 October 2009. 
  35. ^ Saltzman, Marc (8 November 2005). "Donkey Kong Country 3 Review / Game Boy Advance Game Reviews - Yahoo! Video Games". Yahoo!. Retrieved 6 October 2009. 
  36. ^ "Donkey Kong Country 3 for Game Boy Advance - GameRankings". Game Rankings. Retrieved 6 October 2009. 
  37. ^ "Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble! for SNES - MobyGames". MobyGames. Retrieved 6 October 2009. 
  38. ^ "Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble! for Game Boy Advance - MobyGames". MobyGames. Retrieved 6 October 2009. 
  39. ^ "Japan Platinum Game Chart". 
  40. ^ "US Platinum Game Chart". 

External links[edit]