Donnie Brooks

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Donnie Brooks
Birth name John Dee Abohosh
Also known as Johnny Jordan
Dick Bush
Johnny Faire
Born (1936-02-06)February 6, 1936
Origin Dallas, Texas, United States
Died February 23, 2007(2007-02-23) (aged 71)
Genres Pop, rockabilly, surf rock
Occupation(s) Singer
Labels Era
Fable
Reprise
Happy Tiger
Associated acts 'Truth of Truths' Rock Opera, 1971

Donnie Brooks (February 6, 1936 – February 23, 2007), born John Dee Abohosh, was an American pop music singer.[1] Brooks is a member of the Rockabilly Hall of Fame.

Early life[edit]

Born in Dallas, Texas, Abohosh moved to Ventura, California in his teens, where he was adopted by his stepfather and took the name John D. Faircloth. He discovered a singing voice at a young age and recorded a few minor hits with several small record labels under the stage names Johnny Jordan, Dick Bush (which sole single "Hollywood Party" was his first for Era), and Johnny Faire, the latter gaining some sales with "Bertha Lou" in early 1959, while a cover version by Clint Miller charted nationally.

Success[edit]

Encouraged by friends Dorsey and Johnny Burnette, he persevered in the music business and in late 1959, he made his first recording using the name Donnie Brooks. Called "Li'l Sweetheart," it received a lukewarm reception, but his March 1960 hit single, "Mission Bell" on Era Records demonstrated a quality voice in an upbeat song that peaked at No. 7 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.[2] His follow-up, "Doll House"/"Round Robin" (a double-sided hit single with a color picture sleeve on Era Records) peaked at No. 31 in December 1960.

Decline[edit]

Although he continued to record through the 1970s, he never again achieved the same level of success. In 1971, Brooks played the role of Christ in the rock opera "Truth of Truths" for Oak Records. The record was produced by Ray Ruff, who previously worked for ABC-Paramount, Happy Tiger and Dot.[1] Brooks toured with other performers from the early rock and roll era in oldies revival shows. Donnie had 5 children, Tony, Steve, Cathy, Saji, and Shad. All are still living.

Death[edit]

Brooks died of a heart attack following a long illness on February 23, 2007. He was 71.

There was a special memorial service and rockabilly show in his honor on Sunday, March 26, 2007 at the Elks Lodge in Burbank, California.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Long, Donald John (July 31, 2003). "Interview with Ray Ruff & Donnie Brooks". One-Way.org. Retrieved January 24, 2010. 
  2. ^ Whitburn, Joel (1998). Billboard Top 10 Charts, 1958-1997. Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin: Record Research Inc. p. 46. ISBN 0-89820-126-8. 

External links[edit]