Donniel Hartman

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Donniel Hartman
Rabbi Dr. Donniel Hartman.jpg
Main interests Human Rights  • Pluralism • Israel  • Judaism
Influences

Donniel Hartman is a Jewish Israeli Modern Orthodox rabbi and educator. He is President of the Shalom Hartman Institute in Jerusalem, Israel. He has written books and essays on Judaism and modernity and is a frequent speaker at academic conferences and synagogues[1] in the United States and Canada. In 2009, he spoke at the Grand Valley State University Conference, "Religion and the Challenges of Modernity."[2] In the 1990s, he was scholar in residence at the Jewish Community Center of the Palisades in New Jersey.[3] He was described by a Reform Judaism organization as a thinker "whose thoughts, observations, and analysis of Israeli society are radical and refreshing."[4]

Education[edit]

Hartman has a doctorate in Jewish philosophy from The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, a Master of Arts in political philosophy from New York University, and a Master of Arts in religion from Temple University.

Philosophy[edit]

Hartman has set up a program at the Shalom Hartman Institute that could lead to women being ordained as rabbis.[5]

He has argued for the need for Israelis to accept a two-state solution that recognizes Palestinian interests and to provide a "multiple narrative" for Israel that accepts non-Jewish Israelis.[6]

He has said that Israel and Diaspora Jewry must "rethink" their relationship.[7]

In 2007, the Hartman Institute, under Donniel Hartman's direction, set up a religious high school for girls, Midrashiya,[8] whose curriculum includes "a critical approach to the study of Jewish texts," volunteer work, and a sex-education curriculum, "one of the first ever among religious schools in Israel."[9]

Published works[edit]

See also[edit]

Sources and external links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Aventura Turnberry Jewish Center, Avenutura, Florida". Retrieved 2010-01-19. [dead link]
  2. ^ "Religion and the Challenges of Modernity". Retrieved 2010-01-19. 
  3. ^ Goldman, Ari L. (1994-06-19). "A Rabbi's Complicated Relationship With Judaism". New York Times. Retrieved 2010-01-19. 
  4. ^ "The ARZA Rabbinic Council in Action". Retrieved 2010-02-08. 
  5. ^ "Rabbi Is The Highest Title For Teacher". Jewish Week. Retrieved 2009-10-05. [dead link]
  6. ^ "The impossible forfeit". Haaretz. Retrieved 2010-01-19. 
  7. ^ "Israel at 60: Rethinking the Partnership between Israel and World Jewry". Retrieved 2010-01-19. 
  8. ^ "Midrashiya page on Hartman Institute website". Retrieved 2011-06-27. 
  9. ^ "New Orthodox girls schools push egalitarianism". Retrieved 2010-02-08.