Doradidae

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Thorny catfishes
Platydoras costatus 2 (Piotr Kuczynski).jpg
Platydoras armatulus
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Siluriformes
Superfamily: Doradoidea
Family: Doradidae
Bleeker, 1858
Genera[3]

Acanthodoras
Agamyxis
Amblydoras
Anadoras
Anduzedoras
Astrodoras
Centrochir
Centrodoras
Doraops
Doras
Franciscodoras
Hassar
Hemidoras
Hypodoras
Kalyptodoras
Leptodoras
Lithodoras
Megalodoras
Merodoras[1]
Nemadoras
Opsodoras
Orinocodoras
Ossancora[2]
Oxydoras
Physopyxis
Platydoras
Pterodoras
Rhinodoras
Rhynchodoras
Scorpiodoras
Trachydoras
Wertheimeria

The Doradidae are a family of catfishes also known as thorny catfishes or talking catfishes. These fish are native to South America, primarily in Brazil, Peru, and the Guianas.

Doradids are omnivorous.[4]

Taxonomy[edit]

As of 2007, 31 genera and 78 species are in this family.[1] Wertheimeria is considered to be the sister taxon to all other doradids.[5] This family is monophyletic and contains the subfamilies Platydoradinae, Doradinae, and Astrodoradinae, though their relationships are mostly unresolved.[6] The Astrodoradinae contain the genera Amblydoras, Anadoras, Astrodoras, Hypodoras, Merodoras, Physopyxis, and Scorpiodoras.

Distribution[edit]

Doradids occur in most South American basins, though they are absent from the Pacific Coast drainages and from coastal drainages south of the Río de la Plata.[5] About 70% of the valid species occur in the Amazon basin; the Orinoco basin harbors about 22 species and ranks second in species richness.[5] Conversely, only two species of doradids have been described from Brazilian eastern coastal basins: Wertheimeria maculata from the Jequitinhonha and Pardo rivers and Kalyptodoras bahiensis from the Paraguaçu River.[5]

Appearance and anatomy[edit]

Doradids are easily recognized by a well-developed nuchal shield in front of the dorsal fin, as well as well-developed bony lumps along the lateral line that form thorny scutes.[1] Also, doradids typically have three pairs of barbels (no nasal barbels), an adipose fin, and four to six rays on the dorsal fin with a spine on the anterior (first) ray.[7] These fish are sometimes called "talking catfish" because of their ability to produce sound by moving their pectoral spine or vibrating their swim bladder.[7] Sizes range from 3.5 cm (1.4 in) SL in Physopyxis lyra to 120 cm (47 in) FL and 20 kg (44 lb) in Oxydoras niger.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Higuchi, Horácio; Birindelli, José L. O.; Sousa, Leandro M.; Britski, Heraldo A. (2007). "Merodoras nheco, new genus and species from Rio Paraguay basin, Brazil (Siluriformes, Doradidae), and nomination of the new subfamily Astrodoradinae" (PDF). Zootaxa 1446: 31–42. Retrieved 2009-06-24. 
  2. ^ Birindelli, J.L.O. & Sabaj Pérez, M. (2011): Ossancora, new genus of thorny catfish (Teleostei: Siluriformes: Doradidae) with description of one new species. Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, 161: 117-152.
  3. ^ Ferraris, Carl J., Jr. (2007). "Checklist of catfishes, recent and fossil (Osteichthyes: Siluriformes), and catalogue of siluriform primary types" (PDF). Zootaxa 1418: 1–628. Retrieved 2009-06-24. 
  4. ^ Milhomem, Susana Suely Rodrigues; de Souza, Augusto Cesar Paes; Nascimento, Aline Lira do; Carvalho, Jaime Ribeiro, Jr.; Feldberg, Eliana; Pieczarka, Julio Cesar; Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko (2008). "Cytogenetic studies in fishes of the genera Hassar, Platydoras and Opsodoras (Doradidae, Siluriformes) from Jarí and Xingu Rivers, Brazil". Genetics and Molecular Biology 31: 256–260. doi:10.1590/S1415-47572008000200017. 
  5. ^ a b c d e Eler, Eduardo S.; Dergam, Jorge A.; Vênere, Paulo C.; Paiva, Lílian C.; Miranda, Gabriela A.; Oliveira, Alessandro A. (2007). "The karyotypes of the thorny catfishes Wertheimeria maculata Steindachner, 1877 and Hassar wilderi Kindle, 1895 (Siluriformes: Doradidae) and their relevance in doradids chromosomal evolution" (PDF). Genetica 130 (1): 99–103. doi:10.1007/s10709-006-0023-4. PMID 16897457. Retrieved 2009-06-24. 
  6. ^ Moyer, Gregory R.; Burr, Brooks M.; Krajewski, Carey (2004). "Phylogenetic relationships of thorny catfishes (Siluriformes: Doradidae) inferred from molecular and morphological data". Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 140 (4): 551–575. doi:10.1111/j.1096-3642.2004.00114.x. 
  7. ^ a b Nelson, Joseph S. (2006). Fishes of the World. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. ISBN 0-471-25031-7. 

External links[edit]