Dorin Recean

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Dorin Recean
Minister of Interior
Incumbent
Assumed office
24 July 2012
Prime Minister Vlad Filat
Iurie Leancă
Preceded by Alexei Roibu
Personal details
Born (1974-03-17) 17 March 1974 (age 40)
Donduşeni
Alma mater Academy of Economic Studies of Moldova
Newport International University

Dorin Recean (born 17 March 1974) is a Moldovan academic and politician, who has been serving as interior minister of Moldova since July 2012.

Early life and education[edit]

Recean was born in Donduşeni on 17 March 1974.[1] In 1996, he graduated from the Academy of Economic Studies of Moldova with a bachelor's degree in international business management.[2] Then he obtained a master's degree in business administration from Newport International University's Belgium branch in 2000.[2]

Career[edit]

Recean started his career as a lecturer in 1995 at his alma mater, the Academy of Economic Studies, and continued to teach there until 2007.[3] From 2002 to 2010 he also worked in different firms in various capacities. In 2010, he was named deputy minister of information technology and communication and served in the post until 2012.[1] He also taught at the Chisinau-based Newport International University from 2000 to July 2012.[3]

In July 2012, he was appointed interior minister to the cabinet led by Vlad Filat, replacing Alexei Roibu.[4][5] On 31 May 2013, Recean was reappointed interior minister to the cabinet led by Prime Minister Iurie Leancă.[6][7]

Personal life[edit]

Recean is married and has two children.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Deputy Minister". Ministry of Information Technology and Communications. Retrieved 14 April 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c "Dorin Recean, Minister of Internal Affairs". Government of the Republic of Moldova. Retrieved 14 April 2013. 
  3. ^ a b "Moldovan PM demanded Interior and Education Ministers to be dismissed". BASA Press. 24 July 2012. Retrieved 14 April 2013. 
  4. ^ "Two Moldovan Ministers resigned". Politicom. 24 July 2012. Retrieved 14 April 2013. 
  5. ^ "New ministers invested. See what their priorities are!". Tribuna. 24 July 2012. Retrieved 14 April 2013. 
  6. ^ "Iurie Leanca is new prime Minister and Cabinet appointed". Trade Bridge. 31 May 2013. Retrieved 1 June 2013. 
  7. ^ "Leanca’s Cabinet, sworn in". Teleradio Moldova. 31 May 2013. Retrieved 28 December 2013.