Dorothy D. Lee

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For other people of the same name, see Dorothy Lee.

Dorothy Demetracopolou Lee (1905-1975) was an American anthropologist, author and philosopher of cultural anthropology. She was Greek by birth and was educated, married, and raised her children in America.[1]

Lee was a social anthropologist at Vassar College whose work is most often associated with Benjamin Whorf[2] and has written about the languages of the Wintu, Hopi, Tikopia, Trobriand, and many other cultures.

She was lecturer in anthropology and a research anthropologist at Harvard University.[3]

She was the "Leader of the Cultural Anthropology Program" at the Merrill-Palmer School and a former member of the Institute for Intercultural Studies.[4]

Her essays employ anthropological data to explore questions of individual autonomy, the joy of participation, equality of opportunity, freedom and responsibility.[5]

Bibliography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Freedom and Culture, Dorothy Lee, A Spectrum Book, 1961, p. 0, L. C. Cat. Card No.: 59-15584, (c) 1959, by Dorothy Lee
  2. ^ Language Diversity and Thought: A Reformulation of the Linguistic Relativity Hypothesis, John Arthur Lucy, Cambridge University Press, 1992, p. 70, ISBN 0-521-38797-3
  3. ^ Freedom and Culture, Dorothy Lee, A Spectrum Book, 1961, p. 0, L. C. Cat. Card No.: 59-15584, (c) 1959, by Dorothy Lee
  4. ^ About the IIS, The Institute for Intercultural Studies website
  5. ^ Wiley Online Library, American Anthropologist Vol 62, Issue6