DoubleClick for Publishers

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DoubleClick for Publishers by Google
Google Ad Manager logo.png
Developer(s) Google
Operating system Cross-platform (web-based application)
Type Online advertising
Website http://www.google.com/admanager

DoubleClick for Publishers by Google (DFP), formerly called Google Dart,[1] is an advertisement software as a service application run by Google. It can be used as an ad server but it also provides a variety of useful features for managing the sales process of online ads using a publisher's dedicated sales team. Should a publisher not sell out all their available ad inventory, it can choose to run either other ad networks or AdSense ads as remnant inventory in DoubleClick for Publishers.

How it works[edit]

  • The webmaster inserts the Google Publisher Tag (GPT) JavaScript code into a webpage.
  • Each time this page is visited, the JavaScript code creates an IFrame, DFP decides which campaign wins and deliver the creative to the IFrame.

Types of ads available[edit]

DFP differentiates between two types of ads:

  • Priority (based on time/duration)
  • CPM (based on price)

For priority based campaigns the following priorities can be set:

Standard

The most common priority for ad campaigns. Should be used as default.

Premium

The reason to use premium ad campaigns would be to accelerate the speed of delivering a campaign. The premium ad will run roughly 10 times for every standard ad in rotation.

Exclusive

If any ad is marked as exclusive it will not display any other types of ads. It is possible to have more than one exclusive ad running at one time in which case they would rotate evenly with the other exclusive ads. Exclusive ads can only be sold on a Cost Per Day (CPD) basis. Default is for one week but you can set any time frame, (for example a month).

For CPM campaigns:

Remnant

Any ads not sold by a publisher's sales team. If enabled (by clicking a checkbox) in Google Ad Manager (GAM) the publisher would be paid for running AdSense ads.

House

Ads run by the publisher to promote their own services such as to promote subscriptions to one of their magazines.

DoubleClick for Publishers[edit]

Google acquired DoubleClick in March 2008 and later in February 2010 Google launched DoubleClick for Publishers and DoubleClick for Publishers Small Business. DoubleClick for Publishers has since replaced Ad Manager.

Managing, delivering and measuring the Performance of ads

Ad-serving technology for ad exchange helps online publishers make money from the content through various channels may be their own sales force, ad network or through combination of both. Managing ads have been simplified with the ad serving technology for online publishers (news sites, online communities, entertainment sites, social networks, e-commerce sites). To manage the complex process of how and when the ads appear on their websites and allocate ad space most effectively major online publishers use ad serving technology.

With new set of ad serving algorithm and new set of APIs ad server baseline has been improved and DART is now Double Click For Publishers (DFP) for large publishers and Google gets a better standpoint in advertising industry with a move from GAM to DFP Small Business for smaller websites. Rebranding for publishers has been broadened as open public API enables publishers to integrate their own API with DFP and with dynamic allocation features publishers are allowed to bid for multiple ad networks.

Ad inventory solutions available are: DFP Small Business (free - if you serve less than 90 million monthly ad impressions) and the DFP Premium Solution.

DoubleClick for Publishers Small Business[edit]

DFP Small Business is a hosted ad management solution that helps growing publishers to move ahead with the set of sophisticated feature set. DFP Small Business offers a complete toolkit for managing and growing both directly and indirectly sold advertising including streamlined trafficking, ad delivery, advanced forecasting and granular reporting, inventory management, new web service API, interactive user interface, integrated revenue optimization, and direct access to the advertisers from all over the world.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Schonfeld, Erick (22 February 2010). "DART Is Now DoubleClick For Publishers, Google Ad Manager Gets Rebranded DFP Small Business". TechCrunch. Retrieved 21 November 2012. 

External links[edit]