Double Mountain Fork Brazos River

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Coordinates: 33°16′03″N 100°00′38″W / 33.26750°N 100.01056°W / 33.26750; -100.01056
Double Mountain Fork Brazos River
Stream
Double Mountain Fork Brazos River Texas 2014.jpg
Double Mountain Fork, Garza County, Texas
Country  United States
State  Texas
Location Lynn, Garza, Kent, Fisher, Haskell, Stonewall Counties
Source Llano Estacado, 18.5 km southeast of Tahoka, Texas
 - location Lynn County, Texas
 - elevation 890 m (2,920 ft)
 - coordinates 33°03′19″N 101°38′17″W / 33.05528°N 101.63806°W / 33.05528; -101.63806
Mouth Confluence Double Mountain / Salt Fork
 - location Stonewall County, Texas
 - elevation 451 m (1,480 ft) [1]
 - coordinates 33°16′03″N 100°00′38″W / 33.26750°N 100.01056°W / 33.26750; -100.01056
Length 280 km (174 mi)
Basin 7,097 km2 (2,740 sq mi) [2]
Website: Handbook of Texas: Double Mountain Fork

The Double Mountain Fork Brazos River is an ephemeral, sandy-braided stream about 280 km (170 mi) long, heading on the Llano Estacado of West Texas about 18.5 km (11.5 mi) southeast of Tahoka, Texas, flowing east-northeast across the western Rolling Plains to join the Salt Fork, forming the Brazos River about 27 km (17 mi) west-northwest of Haskell, Texas.[3]

Geography[edit]

The Double Mountain Fork Brazos River begins as a shallow draw near the eastern edge of the Llano Estacado in Lynn County, about 5 km (3.1 mi) northeast of the small farming community of Draw, Texas. The stream generally runs eastward across southern Garza County, where it is fed by springs, providing a minimal base flow that is intermittently punctuated by rainfall and associated runoff.[4] At the western edge of Kent County, approximately 20 km (12 mi) east-northeast of Justiceburg, the Double Mountain Fork merges with the North Fork. The Double Mountain Fork then continues eastward across southern Kent County, northwestern Fisher County and into southern Stonewall County, where it passes to the south of Double Mountains, a pair of flat-topped hills located 21 km (13 mi) southwest of Aspermont, Texas. Double Mountains forms part of the high ground dividing the watersheds of the Salt Fork to the north and the Double Mountain Fork to the south. To the east of Double Mountains, the Double Mountain Fork flows into western Haskell County before turning north and back westward into eastern Stonewall County where it merges with the Salt Fork to form the Brazos River (proper), northeast of Aspermont, Texas.[5]

Proper name[edit]

According to a 1964 decision by the United States Board on Geographical Names, this tributary of the Brazos is properly called the "Double Mountain Fork Brazos River", and should not be called the "Double Mountain Fork of the Brazos River" nor the "Double Mountain Fork of Brazos River".[3] This stream is often mistakenly referred to as the "South Fork of the Double Mountain Fork of the Brazos River."[6][7] Perhaps this is an attempt to distinguish this stream from the North Fork Double Mountain Fork Brazos River, a tributary of the Double Mountain Fork. The stream described here, however, is the main stem of the Double Mountain Fork Brazos River and, therefore, it is not a tributary of the Double Mountain Fork, rather it is a tributary of the Brazos River.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Double Mountain Fork Brazos River
  2. ^ Seaber, P.R., Kapinos, F.P. and Knapp, G.L. 1987. Hydrological unit maps. United States Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 2294, p. 46.
  3. ^ a b United States Board on Geographical Names. 1964. Decisions on Geographical Names in the United States, Decision list no. 6402, United States Department of the Interior, Washington DC, p. 51.
  4. ^ Brune, G.M. 1981. Springs of Texas. Fort Worth, TX: Branch-Smith, p. 193-195.
  5. ^ "Double Mountain Fork of the Brazos River". Handbook of Texas Online. Retrieved 2010-02-19. 
  6. ^ "Alan Henry Reservoir (Brazos River Basin)". Austin, Texas: Texas Water Development Board. Retrieved December 25, 2013. 
  7. ^ Hurst, Stance (2011). "Landscapes, Floods, and Archaeological Research" (PDF). Notes from the Field: The Newsletter of Lubbock Lake National Historic Landmark. Lubbock, Texas: Museum of Texas Tech University. pp. 8–10. Retrieved December 25, 2013. 

External links[edit]