Doublecross (Transformers)

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Doublecross
Doublecross.jpg
Autobot
Information
Sub-group Monsterbots
Function Supply Procurer
Motto "Decepticon destruction is my favorite sport... and mine, too."
Alternate Modes Two headed dragon
Series Transformers: Generation 1
Japanese voice actor Michihiro Ikemizu

Doublecross is a fictional character from the various Transformers universes. He is an Autobot supply procurer who turns into a two headed dragon.[1][2]

Transformers: Generation 1[edit]

Despite the above-average skill Doublecross has for his job, in almost any other circumstance, other Autobots can't depend on Doublecross for anything… in fact, he can't even depend on himself. His twin-headed dragon mode is not just for show – designed to allow each of his heads to process their input individually, thereby maximizing his efficiency, an unanticipated side-effect resulted in the formation of a true split personality, which even carries over to Doublecross's robot mode.[3] His two minds can never agree on anything, and as many Autobots have discovered, a deal made with one will not necessarily be upheld by the other. His problems, however, do not impede his ferocious and savage abilities as a warrior - in dragon mode, his razor-fanged jaws conceal a fusion-generated flamethrower, and he wields an armor-corroding rust-ray rifle in robot mode. Although highly fuel efficient and a fierce fighter, Doublecross is unfortunately not particularly strong.[4]

Animated series[edit]

Although the Monsterbots were introduced after the end of the US animated series, they did appear in animated form in a commercial. Doublecross and the Monsterbots were created accidentally during an attempt to create new Autobots. Kup raced to warn Rodimus Prime and Blurr of the accident, as the wild Monsterbots trashed the lab where they were born. Thankfully the Decepticons attacked just then and the Monsterbots burst out of the building through the wall to fight them. Rodimus expressed relief that, though they were monsters, at least they were Autobot monsters.

The Monsterbots were among the few new 1987 toys who did not make it into the fourth and final season of the American Transformers animated series. They did, however, make it to the small screen on the other side of the Pacific, when they appeared in the Japanese-exclusive series, Transformers: Headmasters.

The Monsterbots made their debut accompanying Rodimus Prime to Planet Beast, home of the Battle Beasts, which had been invaded by the Decepticons. Rescuing the captive Battle Beasts from the Decepticons' subterranean factory, the Monsterbots were appointed by Rodimus to stay behind on the planet and keep guard for a time, in case the Decepticons returned; the trio accepted the position, their animalistic alternate modes well suited to the planet. The Monsterbots later rejoined the main Autobot force, and accompanied the new leader, Fortress Maximus, and his crew on their pursuit of the Decepticons from planet to planet, entering combat on the planet Paradise, where the three of them turned their fire-breath on Abominus and used it to detonate the Decepticons' energon cubes.

Of the three Monsterbots, Doublecross received the most attention, as his unusual personality quirk offered opportunities for humor. While attempting to put out a fire on Paradise, one head instructed the other to shoot water instead of fire, forgetting that they did not possess that ability. Later, when the Decepticons returned to Earth and attacked one of the Autobot bases there, Doublecross's two heads could not agree on which direction to take to get to the battle, and he was attacked and defeated by the Horrorcons.

Marvel Comics[edit]

Small roles were fated for the Monsterbots even in the pages of Marvel Comics Transformers series. Introduced in the Headmasters four-issue miniseries, the three Monsterbots joined with Fortress Maximus and other like-minded Autobots who wanted to leave Cybertron in order to escape the war on the planet. Relocating to the world of Nebulos, they were followed by Scorponok's Decepticon forces, who began wreaking havoc on the planet after members of both factions bonded to Nebulan natives as "Headmasters". Attempting to defend Nebulos's beautiful Mercury Gardens against a Decepticon attack, the Monsterbots were overpowered by the Decepticon Headmasters and forced to retreat. They later departed Nebulos with the rest of Maximus's team and were integrated into the larger Autobot army on Earth.

Doublecross last appeared in issue #41, in a story called "Totaled!" where the Decepticon under Ratbat ambushed the Autobot. Although not depicted as being injured in the battle, it is possible Doublecross was injured or killed in this story, because he did not appear again in the Marvel storyline.

3H Enterprises/Fun Publications[edit]

Although they issue never saw release except as artwork on the internet, the Monsterbots were to make an appearance in the fourth issue of Transformer: Universe - The Wreckers by 3H Enterprises. They were among the patrons of a bar on spaceport CSSB-16 when it was being visited by Devcon and the Beast Machine Dinobots.

The first four pages of Transformers: Universe - Wreckers #4 were eventually finished and printed in issue 16 of the Transformers Collectors Club magazine.

Dreamwave Productions[edit]

Although Doublecross didn't appear in any Dreamwave storyline, he did get a full page biography in the More Than Meets The Eye comic.[5]

Toys[edit]

  • Generation 1 Doublecross (1987)
The Doublecross toy could shoot sparks from his chest if you flicked a switch on his back.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lee's Guide to Loose 1987 Transformers: Autobots. Lee's Toy Review magazine, issue #205, December 2009
  2. ^ Jim Sorenson & Bill Forster (July 22, 2008). Transformers: The Ark II. IDW Publishing. p. 32. ISBN 978-1-60010-180-9. 
  3. ^ Transformers: The Ark II, Volume 2 By Jim Sorenson, Nick Roche, William Forster, page 32-34
  4. ^ Doublecross (Autobot Monsterbots, Transformers G1)
  5. ^ Transformers: More Than Meets the Eye, Volume 1 By James McDonough, Don Figueroa, Adam Patyk, Guido Guidi, Pat Lee, page 94