Doug Bremner

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James Douglas (Doug) Bremner, M.D., (born June 5, 1961) is a physician, researcher, and writer based in Atlanta, Georgia.[1] He has conducted research on Posttraumatic stress disorder[2] and the relationship between Depression and suicide and the acne drug Accutane (Roaccutane, or isotretinoin).[3]

Early life and education[edit]

Bremner was born in Topeka, Kansas and was raised in Olympia, Washington.[4][5] He received a B.A. in English literature from the University of Puget Sound, and a medical degree from Duke University School of Medicine. He did residencies in psychiatry and nuclear medicine at the Yale University School of Medicine.[1]

Career[edit]

Bremner was an assistant and associate professor of psychiatry and radiology at the Yale University School of Medicine and National Center for PTSD from 1991-2000[2] and Professor of Psychiatry and Radiology, Director of the Emory Clinical Neuroscience Research Unit[6] at the Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia and Director of Mental Health Research at the Atlanta Veterans Administration Medical Center in Decatur, Georgia since 2000.[1]

Bremner's brain imaging studies showed smaller volume of the hippocampus in people with Post traumatic stress disorder related to childhood abuse or Vietnam combat; he was the first to publish that relationship.[7] These studies and others resulted in him being one of the most highly cited researchers in the field of Post traumatic stress disorder.[8]

Bremner's research used PET brain imaging to show a decrease in frontal lobe brain function in acne patients treated with Accutane (isotretinoin). He was an expert witness in litigation related to the relationship between Accutane and suicide and depression, including the case of Charles J. Bishop,[3] which he describes in the narrative non-fiction book, The Goose That Laid the Golden Egg.

Bremner's activities as a healthcare consumer advocate and activist include authorship of Before You Take That Pill: Why the Drug Industry May Be Bad for Your Health: Risks and Side Effects You Won't Find on the Label of Commonly Prescribed Drugs, Vitamins, and Supplements. He is frequently quoted in the media in stories related to risks of prescription medications.[9] He has also appeared multiple times on CNN HLN (TV channel) and truTV discussing medical and mental health aspects of crime stories in the news.[10] He was an active participant in protests related to the Grady Memorial Hospital dialysis crisis of 2009 which resulted in a successful outcome for the affected patients.[11]

Bremner has authored or co-authored over 200 peer reviewed scientific articles, book chapters, and books in the field of PTSD, depression, and drug safety.[12]

He is on the editorial boards of several journals and the Scientific Advisory and Executive Boards of several foundations dedicated to promoting mental health of military personnel deployed to the Iraq War and War in Afghanistan (2001-present). He has received several awards for his work, including the Chaim and Bela Danieli Award for Research and Service in Traumatic Stress from the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.[13]

Bremner is also a screenwriter with awards including Quarterfinalist at the 2011 PAGE International Screenwriters Awards.[14]

Bibliography[edit]

References[edit]

As of this edit, this article uses content from "J. Douglas Bremner, MD", which is licensed in a way that permits reuse under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License, but not under the GFDL. All relevant terms must be followed.[non-primary source needed][self-published source?]

  1. ^ a b c "Emory University School of Medicine: Meet Our Faculty" accessed 10/11/11.
  2. ^ a b Raines, Laura: "A new approach to treating PTSD: Doctor wants to help vets live in the moment," Atlanta Journal Constitution, 2/24/08, accessed 10/11/11[dead link]
  3. ^ a b Duenwald, Mary: "Debate on Acne Drug's Safety Persists Over Two Decades." The New York Times, 1/22/2002. Accessed 10/11/11.
  4. ^ "Death Claims Mrs. Bremner," The Daily Olympian, p. 1, Feb 14, 1966. Accessed at http://www.bremnerhistory.com/laurnellbremner/obituary.pdf on 10/11/11
  5. ^ "M. Laurnell Bremner," The Daily Olympian, p. 2, Feb 14, 1966. Accessed at http://www.bremnerhistory.com/laurnellbremner/obituary.pdf on 10/11/11
  6. ^ http://userwww.service.emory.edu/~jdbremn/
  7. ^ Goleman, Daniel: "Severe Trauma May Damage the Brain as Well as the Psyche," The New York Times, 8/1/1995, accessed 10/11/11.
  8. ^ "Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: an Interview with J. Douglas Bremner", ISI Essential Science Indicators Special Topics (May 2004), accessed 10/11/11.
  9. ^ Rice, Sabriya: "Are you taking too many meds?" CNNHealth, May 31, 2011. Accessed 10/11/11.
  10. ^ "Transcript: Nancy Grace: Attorney Charged in Murder-for-Hire Plot Against Wife" accessed 10/11/11.
  11. ^ Advocates for Responsible Care: Dialysis Crisis, accessed 10/11/11
  12. ^ Pubmed articles by JD Bremner, accessed 10/11/11.
  13. ^ International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies: Awards and Honors. Accessed 10/11/11.
  14. ^ The 2011 Page International Screenwriters Awards Quarterfinalists, accessed 10/11/11.

External links[edit]