Doug Fine

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Doug Fine
Born New York, USA
Residence New Mexico, USA
Nationality American
Alma mater Stanford University
Occupation Author, Journalist, Filmmaker, Speaker, Comedian
Website
[1]

Doug Fine is an American author, journalist, humorist, and goat herder.[1][2]

Early life[edit]

Fine left the East Coast of the United States for college in 1989.[3] Shortly thereafter, he strapped a pack on his back and began his career as a freelance journalist for such organizations as the Washington Post, Salon, U.S. News and World Report, Sierra, Wired, Outside, National Public Radio, and many other venues.[4] His investigative reporting took him to five continents, often to remote locations like Burma, Rwanda, Laos, Guatemala and Tajikistan.[5] One of his dispatches, on Burmese democracy efforts, was read into the Congressional Record.[6] Fine won numerous awards for his radio reporting from rural Alaska before he moved to New Mexico.[7]

Not Really An Alaskan Mountain Man[edit]

In an experiment to see if someone raised in suburban consumer culture could manage a comfortable life in an extremely rural situation, Fine moved to a remote part of Alaska in the winter of 1998. The result was his first book, Not Really An Alaskan Mountain Man, published by Alaska Northwest Books, an imprint of Graphic Arts Center Publishing. As Fine works to hone what he calls his "Indigenous Gene,"[3] the book is a document of wilderness adventure as Fine learns how to live in a one-room cabin surrounded by moose and "non-liberals."[3]

Farewell, My Subaru[edit]

Fine's second book, Farewell, My Subaru, was published March 24, 2009 by Villard Books, an imprint of Random House. The book documents life at Fine's Funky Butte Ranch. It became a bestseller and is now in its seventh printing, with Chinese and Korean language editions.[8] Fine's challenges in the book come from dealing with his mischievous goats, setting up his Funky Butte Ranch's solar power system, converting his used truck to run on vegetable oil, and growing his ranch's own crops.[9]

Farewell, My Subaru's critical acclaim in national and international media includes comparisons to Bill Bryson and Douglas Adams,[10] landing Fine television interviews on CNN[11] and on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno.[12]

Too High to Fail[edit]

Fine's third book, Too High to Fail: Cannabis and the New Green Economic Revolution, was published by Gotham Books, an imprint of Penguin Group, on August 2, 2012.[13] Pre-publication reviews included a starred Kirkus review reading in part, "Fine examines how the American people have borne the massive economic and social expenditures of the failed Drug War, which is "as unconscionably wrong for America as segregation and DDT." A captivating, solidly documented work rendered with wit and humor."[14] Fine began promoting the book with an appearance on the Conan O'Brien show on July 25, 2012. Three weeks after publication, Too High to Fail debuted at #2 on the Denver Post bestseller list.[15]

Personal life[edit]

Fine lives on the solar-powered Funky Butte Ranch, where he is a columnist for New Mexico Magazine.[16]

Works[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Doug Fine, Journalist, New Mexico". http://www.smithsonianmag.com/people-places/15545322.html. Retrieved 2010-12-28. 
  2. ^ "Doug Fine: Author of Farewell, My Subaru talks to WW about green ranching, veggie-powered monster trucks, and the mystique of goat ice cream". http://wweek.com/editorial/3423/10823/. Retrieved 2010-12-28. 
  3. ^ a b c "About The Author". Alaska Northwest Books. 
  4. ^ "Interview: Author Doug Fine". http://blog.oregonlive.com/books/2008/04/interview_author_doug_fine.html (Oregonian). 2008-04-17. Retrieved 2010-12-28. 
  5. ^ Staci Matlock (March 25, 2008). "Writer finds funny side to carbon-light life". Santa Fe New Mexican. Archived from the original on 2012-03-14. Retrieved 2010-12-28. 
  6. ^ "RMSS Featured Speakers". University of Denver. Retrieved 2010-12-28. 
  7. ^ "Alaska Press Club Awards 2003". http://www.alaskapressclub.org/index.php/awards/2003awards (Alaska Press Club). Retrieved 2010-12-29. 
  8. ^ Concannon, Jim (2009-08-28). "Paperback nonfiction bestsellers, Aug. 30 - Sept. 5". http://www.boston.com/ae/books/blog/2009/08/paperback_nonfi_101.html. Retrieved 2010-12-28. [dead link]
  9. ^ "Meet Doug Fine, Sustainable Superman". http://www.takepart.com/news/2010/12/27/meet-doug-fine-sustainable-superman. Retrieved 2010-12-28. 
  10. ^ "News and Reviews (And Media Appearances)". dougfine.com. Retrieved 2010-12-28. 
  11. ^ "Doug Fine on CNN". Cable News Network. Retrieved 2010-12-13. 
  12. ^ "RMSS Featured Speakers". University of Denver. Retrieved 11 October 2014. 
  13. ^ "Bio". dougfine.com. Retrieved 2012-19-16.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  14. ^ "Too High to Fail, By Doug Fine". Kirkus Book Reviews. Retrieved July 26, 2012. 
  15. ^ "Business best sellers: "Topgrading" tops list". Denver Post. 2012-08-26. Retrieved 11 October 2014. 
  16. ^ "Greener Acres, by Doug Fine, the Carbon-Neutral Cowboy". http://www.nmmagazine.com/greeneracres.php. Retrieved 2010-12-28. 

External links[edit]