Doug Fraser (Scottish footballer)

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Doug Fraser
Personal information
Full name Doug M. Fraser
Date of birth (1941-12-08) 8 December 1941 (age 72)
Place of birth Aberdeen, Scotland
Height 5 ft 9 in (1.75 m)
Playing position Full back
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1960–1963 Aberdeen 64 (1)
1963–1971 West Bromwich Albion 257 (8)
1971–1973 Nottingham Forest 85 (3)
1973–1974 Walsall[1] 27 (0)
National team
1968 Scotland 2 (0)
Teams managed
1974–1977 Walsall
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Doug Fraser (born 8 December 1941 in Aberdeen) was a Scottish football full-back.

Fraser began his career in Scottish minor football, appearing for Eaglesham Amateur and Blantyre Celtic.[2] After being rejected by both Celtic and Leeds United. Following trials Fraser turned professional with Aberdeen. Fraser's form attracted the attentions of English clubs and in September 1963 West Bromwich Albion manager Jimmy Hagan paid £23,000 for his signature. Making his debut against Birmingham City that same month, Fraser initially played in a number of defensive and midfield positions before making the right back slot his own.[3] Fraser played in four cup finals during his time at The Hawthorns and also made two appearances for Scotland against Cyprus and the Netherlands.[3] His final Albion game was a 2–2 draw against Chelsea in November 1970 before manager Alan Ashman sold him to Nottingham Forest for £35,000.[3] He would later play for Walsall where he hit the headlines after he was red carded for fighting with Bristol Rovers' Kenny Stephens - a former Albion teammate.[3]

After his retirement Fraser was appointed to the manager's chair at Walsall and held the position until 1977. Following this Fraser left football and took up a position as a prison guard at Nottingham Gaol[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ B.J. Hugman, Rothmans Football League Players Records The Complete A-Z 1946-1981, 1981, p. 145
  2. ^ a b T. Matthews, West Bromwich Albion - The Complete Record, 2007, p. 111
  3. ^ a b c d G, Willmore, The Hawthorns Encyclopedia, 1996, p. 78