Doug Mohns

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Doug Mohns
1962 Topps Doug Mohns.JPG
Born (1933-12-13)December 13, 1933
Capreol, ON, CAN
Died February 7, 2014(2014-02-07) (aged 80)
Reading, MA, USA
Height 6 ft 0 in (183 cm)
Weight 185 lb (84 kg; 13 st 3 lb)
Position Defence/Left Wing
Shot Left
Played for Boston Bruins
Chicago Black Hawks
Minnesota North Stars
Atlanta Flames
Washington Capitals
Playing career 1953–1975

Douglas Allen "Diesel" Mohns (December 13, 1933 – February 7, 2014) was a professional ice hockey player who played 22 seasons in the National Hockey League from 1953–54 until 1974–75. Mohns twice won the most coveted prize in junior hockey, the Memorial Cup. He played on the 1951 and 1953 Barrie Flyers teams.

Playing career[edit]

Mohns played 1390 career NHL games, scoring 248 goals and 462 assists for 710 points, as well as compiling 1250 penalty minutes. Mohns played both forward and defence in his career. Mohns joined the Boston Bruins in 1953, where he became a versatile cornerstone of that franchise for 11 seasons. An early slapshot expert, Doug Mohns would combine skating speed & breakout passing skills with rugged reliability. Mohns starred with Bruins captain and blueline Stalwart Fern Flaman on defence and longtime teammate, smooth Centre Don McKenney on offence, during the Bruins' halcyon years of the late 1950s. Doug Mohns became an Alternate Captain of the Boston Bruins in 1960. He remained a team pillar during the difficult reconstruction period of the early 1960s.

Doug Mohns achieved much of his later career success with the Chicago Black Hawks. He played left wing on one of the greatest lines in NHL history, the "Scooter Line", with centre Stan Mikita and right wing Kenny Wharram. Their speed and puck handling ability fueled the Black Hawks' high-powered offence during this time period. Mohns was also known as an enforcer for Bobby Hull.[citation needed] Mohns finished his 22 season long career as the captain of the expansion Washington Capitals. He was one of the first players to wear a helmet.

Mohns’s marriage to Jane Foster ended with her death in 1988. In addition to his wife, he is survived by a sister, Erma Wilson; a son, Douglas Jr.; a daughter, Andrea Brillaud; a stepson, Greg Ansin; a stepdaughter, Lisa Ansin; and nine grandchildren.[1] Mohns was heavily involved with charity activities, including serving on the board of the Dianne DeVanna Center in support of family health, and with the local food pantry.

He died on February 7, 2014 at the age of 80, of myelodysplastic syndrome.[2][3]

Career statistics[edit]

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1951–52 Barrie Flyers OHA 53 40 36 76 0
1952–53 Barrie Flyers OHA 56 34 42 76 0
1953–54 Boston Bruins NHL 70 13 14 27 27 4 1 0 1 4
1954–55 Boston Bruins NHL 70 14 18 32 82 5 0 0 0 4
1955–56 Boston Bruins NHL 64 10 8 18 48
1956–57 Boston Bruins NHL 68 6 34 40 89 10 2 3 5 2
1957–58 Boston Bruins NHL 54 5 16 21 28 12 3 10 13 18
1958–59 Boston Bruins NHL 47 6 24 30 40 4 0 2 2 12
1959–60 Boston Bruins NHL 65 20 25 45 62
1960–61 Boston Bruins NHL 65 12 21 33 63
1961–62 Boston Bruins NHL 69 16 29 45 74
1962–63 Boston Bruins NHL 68 7 23 30 63
1963–64 Boston Bruins NHL 70 9 17 26 95
1964–65 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 49 13 20 33 84 14 3 4 7 21
1965–66 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 70 22 27 49 63 5 1 0 1 4
1966–67 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 61 25 35 60 58 5 0 5 5 8
1967–68 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 65 24 29 53 53 11 1 5 6 12
1968–69 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 65 22 19 41 47
1969–70 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 66 6 27 33 46 8 0 2 2 15
1970–71 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 39 4 6 10 16
1970–71 Minnesota North Stars NHL 17 2 5 7 14 6 2 2 4 10
1971–72 Minnesota North Stars NHL 78 6 30 36 82 4 1 2 3 10
1972–73 Minnesota North Stars NHL 67 4 13 17 52 6 0 1 1 2
1973–74 Atlanta Flames NHL 28 0 3 3 10
1974–75 Washington Capitals NHL 75 2 19 21 54
NHL totals 1390 248 462 710 1250 94 14 36 50 122


See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Position created
Washington Capitals captain
1974–75
Succeeded by
Bill Clement