Douglas Bravo

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Douglas Bravo

Douglas Bravo (born March 11, 1932) is a Venezuelan politician and former guerrilla fighter.

Bravo became a member of the Communist Party of Venezuela in 1946, only to be expelled from it in 1964.

By March 1966, he directed the Partido de la Revolución Venezolana (PRV) (Party of Venezuelan Revolution). He led the organization's militant wing, the Fuerzas Armadas de Liberación Nacional (FALN) ("Armed Forces of National Liberation"), in an insurgency within Venezuela that lasted into the mid-1970s. He was later exiled to France, but returned.[citation needed]

Bravo is a fervent anti-imperialist. He had contacts with Che Guevara, and was ideologically opposed to the policies of the Soviet Union.[citation needed]

As part of his plan to foment a successful revolution in Venezuela, Bravo recruited military officers sympathetic to his cause within the ranks of the Army. One such officer was a young Hugo Chávez, whom Bravo met in 1980.[citation needed] Chávez later became the President of Venezuela.

Bravo participated in the 1992 Venezuelan coup d'état attempts, and was arrested; he was pardoned the following year.[citation needed]

Bravo is currently the leader of the Third Road Movement,[citation needed] which criticizes the Chávez administration for its reliance on energy companies from rich industrialized countries.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Romero, Simon (August 16, 2006). "For Venezuela, as Distaste for U.S. Grows, So Does Trade". The New York Times.