Dow AgroSciences

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Dow AgroSciences LLC
Type Fully Owned Subsidiary
Industry Agricultural Supplies
Founders Eli Lilly and Company and Dow Chemical Company in 1989
Headquarters Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
Products Insecticide, Herbicide, Fungicide, Fumigant and Seed Technologies
Parent Dow Chemical Company
Website www.dowagro.com

Dow AgroSciences LLC is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Dow Chemical Company specializing in not only agricultural chemicals such as pesticides, but also seeds and biotechnology solutions. The company is based in Indianapolis, Indiana, in the United States. On 31 January, 2006, Dow AgroSciences announced that it had received regulatory approval for the world's first plant-cell-produced vaccine against Newcastle disease virus from USDA Center for Veterinary Biologics. Dow AgroSciences operates brand names such as Sentricon, Vikane, Mycogen, SmartStax, Pfister Seed, Phytogen, Prairie Brand Seed, Profume, Renze Seeds and Triumph Seed.

Dow AgroSciences also produces Omega-9 canola and sunflower oils. These oils are said to be more healthy than alternative oils due to a combination of high-oleic and low-linoleic fatty acids.[1]

Ivor Watkins Dow, the predecessor in New Zealand of Dow AgroSciences, operated a plant near New Plymouth, accused of exposing nearby residents to dioxins.[2]

In October 2011, the U.S. Justice Department announced that a biotech specialist at Cargill had pleaded guilty to stealing information from Cargill and Dow AgroSciences. Kexue Huang, a Chinese national, was discovered to be passing information back to China from Dow for at least 3 years, from 2007 to 2010.[3]

Dow AgoSciences' Enlist Weed Control System is in the approval stage as of 2014.Dow AgroSciences has recently received the registration of Arylex active (Halauxifen-methyl) from the Chinese Institute for the Control of Agrochemicals, Ministry of Agriculture (ICAMA).[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About Omega-9 Oils". Dow AgroSciences. 
  2. ^ Collins, Simon (10 September 2004). "Dioxin response slow despite sinister signs". NZ Herald. 
  3. ^ Tom Webb (2011-10-20). "A Cargill scientist, and a spy for China". Twin Cities Pioneer Press. 
  4. ^ "China approves Quelex™ the first herbicide with Arylex™ Active", AgroPages Apr. 28, 2014, Retrieved May 12th, 2014.

External links[edit]