Doylestown, Ohio

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Doylestown, Ohio
Village
Motto: "Village Of Values A Town Of Tradition"
Location of Doylestown, Ohio
Location of Doylestown, Ohio
Coordinates: 40°58′13″N 81°41′40″W / 40.97028°N 81.69444°W / 40.97028; -81.69444Coordinates: 40°58′13″N 81°41′40″W / 40.97028°N 81.69444°W / 40.97028; -81.69444
Country United States
State Ohio
County Wayne
Government
 • Mayor Terry L. Lindeman
Area[1]
 • Total 1.88 sq mi (4.87 km2)
 • Land 1.88 sq mi (4.87 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation[2] 1,250 ft (381 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 3,051
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 3,054
 • Density 1,622.9/sq mi (626.6/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 44230
Area code(s) 330
FIPS code 39-22568[5]
GNIS feature ID 1064552[2]
Website http://www.doylestown.com/

Doylestown is a village located atop the highest point in Wayne County, Ohio, United States, 13 miles southwest of Akron. The population was 3,051 at the 2010 census. Doylestown is served by a branch of the Wayne County Public Library.

History[edit]

Doylestown was officially founded and recorded on Christmas Day, 1827, by William Doyle, a Scotch-Irish Pennsylvanian who first settled in Ohio in Milton Township, some six miles west of his soon-to-be-namesake. Upon moving to the village, Doyle employed a carpenter, John Montgomery, to help him build the first building, a log tavern. Soon after, Doyle encouraged family and friends from Pennsylvania to join him. Opportunity already existed in the surrounding lowlands of the hilltop town with streams flush with running water to power mills.

Woolen mills brought commerce to Doylestown, but nothing could prepare it for the mining boom when coal was discovered in the deep hollows southeast of the village in 1840. Known as Rogues' Hollow for the wild goings-on of miners seeking work after the canals were completed, the hollow was congested with saloons, houses of ill repute, disease, dust and Sunday dog fights.

"Uptown" (as the village is referred to by surrounding residents) entrepreneurs developed pottery works, aluminumware and aluminum welding, and in 1861 John F. Seiberling, father of the future founder of the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. of Akron, arrived and opened the Excelsior Mowers and Droppers factory, the premiere farm equipment company of its time. The boom brought craftsmen and merchants from surrounding states to Doylestown via the Ohio and Erie Canal, which brought passengers and goods from Lake Erie to Clinton, Ohio, east of Doylestown. The eventual influx of Roman Catholics led to the building of SS Peter and Paul R.C. Church, recognized as the first church built in the massive Cleveland Diocese. Doylestown's economic downfall took place when on May 16, 1910, a fire destroyed the mower works and eventually the village's altitude made the cost and logistics of receiving and shipping goods too prohibitive. Also, in 1910 the Chippewa High School was built. This building is now the 5th grade building for the Middle School.

Geography[edit]

Doylestown is at 40°58′13″N 81°41′40″W / 40.97028°N 81.69444°W / 40.97028; -81.69444 (40.970278, -81.694346).[6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 1.88 square miles (4.87 km2), all of it land.[1]

Demographics[edit]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 3,051 people, 1,206 households, and 827 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,622.9 inhabitants per square mile (626.6 /km2). There were 1,292 housing units at an average density of 687.2 per square mile (265.3 /km2). The racial makeup of the village was 97.9% White, 0.6% African American, 0.1% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 0.4% from other races, and 0.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.4% of the population.

There were 1,206 households of which 31.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.1% were married couples living together, 11.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.1% had a male householder with no wife present, and 31.4% were non-families. 27.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 2.98.

The median age in the village was 41.6 years. 24.8% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.9% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 21.9% were from 25 to 44; 27.7% were from 45 to 64; and 18.8% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 46.3% male and 53.7% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 2,799 people, 1,119 households, and 782 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,590.3 people per square mile (614.0/km²). There were 1,167 housing units at an average density of 663.0 per square mile (256.0/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 98.89% White, 0.14% African American, 0.04% Native American, 0.11% Asian, 0.21% from other races, and 0.61% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.61% of the population.

There were 1,119 households out of which 32.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.3% were married couples living together, 9.6% had a, gasp, female householder with no husband present, and 30.1% were non-families. 26.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 2.95.

In the village the population was spread out with 24.8% under the age of 18, 6.9% from 18 to 24, 27.7% from 25 to 44, 24.5% from 45 to 64, and 16.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 89.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.4 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $47,969, and the median income for a family was $57,400. Males had a median income of $39,766 versus $25,701 for females. The per capita income for the village was $21,408. About 3.5% of families and 5.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.7% of those under age 18 and 4.1% of those age 65 or over.

Public services and safety[edit]

The Village of Doylestown maintains and operates a modern water treatment and sewage disposal facility providing approximately 1400 households with pure processed water coming from two wells; one west and one south of the village. Given the village's unique geographical ebbs and flows, much of the sewage system employees "forced mains," pumping effluent to higher areas of the village where gravity then "transports" the "product" to the sewage treatment plant. Doylestown maintains a full-time water department at the village hall where residents can pay bills and conduct business 6 days a week.

The Doylestown Police Department and the Chippewa Township Fire Department provide public safety and emergency medical and fire response. The Police Department operates full-time, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Officers receive state of the art training and provide community outreach, offering free courses in citizen awareness, CPR and women's self-defense. Home-check programs are available while residents are on vacation and a record of the patrol officer's stops are provided on the homeowner's return. Additionally, the Doylestown Police Department has a K-9 unit.

The Chippewa Township Fire Department is a part-time/paid on-call department. The Fire Department operates out of two stations; Station 1 is located on Gates Street inside the village-proper and Station 2 is located on Hatfield Road in the township. The Fire Department has over 40 Firefighter/EMS personnel. The department conducts many community programs to ensure the safety and well being of its residents, schools and businesses.

In 2006, the village installed a digital marquee in the Village Square to replace an aging and limited, manually operated message board. The LED (light emitting diode)marquee, operates 24 hours a day, remotely programmed from a computer in the village hall. As well as text it can provide interactive graphics, providing messages free of charge to any local organization or "public good" displays such as changes in trash pickup, public hearings and Amber Alerts.

Message requests simultaneously appear on the village's Public-access television cable TV station operated by Doylestown Communications, a state of the art, locally owned and operated private business offering phone, internet, cable TV and fiber optics. Doylestown Communications has a full-time customer service and technical assistance center in the downtown business area.

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]