Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors (series)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors
Dragon Ball Z Supersonic Warriors.jpg
The cover of the first Super Sonic Warriors for Game Boy Advance
Developer(s) Cavia
Arc System Works
Publisher(s)
Series Dragon Ball
Platform(s) Game Boy Advance
Nintendo DS
Release date(s) Supersonic Warriors
  • JP March 26, 2004
  • NA June 22, 2004
  • EU August 22, 2004
  • KO September 13, 2004[1]
Supersonic Warriors 2
  • NA November 20, 2005
  • JP December 1, 2005
  • EU February 3, 2006[2]
  • AUS December 8, 2005
Genre(s) Fighting
Mode(s) Single-player
Multiplayer

The Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors (ドラゴンボールZ 舞空闘劇 Doragon Bōru Zetto Bukū Tôgeki?) series is a series of fighting games based on the popular anime series Dragon Ball. The first game, Dragon Ball Z Supersonic Warriors was developed by Arc System Works and Cavia. Released for the Game Boy Advance on June 22, 2004. The game was followed by the 2005 sequel, Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors 2 for the Nintendo DS.

Gameplay[edit]

The games pits two characters of the Dragon Ball franchise against each other in large environments, where they mostly fight in the air. The player can use strong and weak variations of close combat attacks, and charge their ki to fire strong and weak energy blasts. Each character also has three unique "Certain Kill" abilities that deal heavy damage to the opponent. The Certain Kill ability varies depending on where the player is located - above, below or horizontal to the opponent.

Both games also feature tag team options, which allow up to three characters on each side to fight against one another.

Games[edit]

Supersonic Warriors[edit]

Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors (ドラゴンボールZ 舞空闘劇 Doragon Bōru Zetto Bukū Tôgeki?) is the first game in the Supersonic Warriors series and is the ninth instalment of Dragon Ball Z franchise games that are compatible with Nintendo handheld devices.[3] The game is preceded by Dragon Ball Z: Taiketsu and is followed by Dragon Ball Z: Buu’s Fury.[3] The game offers a variety of modes that the player can choose from, and when completed, can earn points to unlock various characters and missions.[4] . It was developed by Arc System Works and Cavia for Banpresto and released for the Game Boy Advance on June 22, 2004.

Story Mode

In this game mode, the player selects one character and fights through a series of eight opponents, which follow the original Dragon Ball Z anime storyline in the chosen characters’ perspective. The story mode is presented through short scenes; where long texts associated with pictures and scenery are involved.[4] Once a scene is done, the player must fight an opponent, continue with the scene, and fight again against computer AI, where the next opponent is slightly more difficult than the previous.[4] As the storyline progresses, the character gains new abilities that enhance the players’ gameplay experience, allowing for more strategic battle combinations.[4] Once the story is completed, the player will gain points that they can spend in the options mode to unlock new characters in order to engage in the storyline from another characters perspective, battling different opponents.[4]

The player selects three characters to form a team and must battle against pre-set enemy teams that are generated by the computer AI.[5] Character selection cannot exceed level four, and in order to defeat the enemy team, the player must fully utilize their three chosen characters’ abilities.[5] Only after defeating the first enemy team, the player can unlock new teams to fight against until the mode is completed.[5]

Defeating the challenge mode grants the greatest amount of points that can be spent in the options menu, allowing for a wider variety of character combinations for teams.[5]

Challenge Mode

The player selects three characters to form a team and must battle against pre-set enemy teams that are generated by the computer AI.[4] Character selection cannot exceed level four, and in order to defeat the enemy team, the player must fully utilize their three chosen characters’ abilities.[4] Only after defeating the first enemy team, the player can unlock new teams to fight against until the mode is completed.[4] Defeating the challenge mode grants the greatest amount of points that can be spent in the options menu, allowing for a wider variety of character combinations for teams.[4]

Z Battle Mode

In Z battle mode the player chooses a character, and must battle against 8 enemies, however after completing a round of Z battle mode, the chosen character is given a ranking.[4] As the player defeats more opponents with a single character, the ranking of that character will increase and various statistics are given, allowing players to continuously build on various characters to complete their full ranking. All rankings and statistics are viewed in the options mode under the rankings tab.[4]

Free Battle Mode

Free battle mode unchains all restrictions that are placed from the other modes, allowing for a free range of battles for any combination of enemies. The player can choose from any character that is available or unlocked, and there are no limits to the levels corresponding to the characters.[4] The mode engages in either a 1on1 or team style of fighting, where the player can chose their own enemies to fight or a random enemy through the random generator.[4]

Link Vs. Mode

Within this game mode, the player leaves the domain of computer AI battles in order to battle against another human player.[3] This game mode can offer a range of battle combinations, movement, and reactions that cannot be executed by the computer AI enemies. Two Game Boy Advances, a link cable are required to play in this mode in order to connect the two players together.[6]

Supersonic Warriors 2[edit]

Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors 2 (ドラゴンボールZ 舞空烈戦 Doragon Bōru Zetto Bukū Ressen?) is the second game in the Supersonic Warriors series. Supersonic Warriors 2 is a direct sequel to Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors and was developed by Arc System Works and Cavia and published by Atari. It was released in 2005 for the Nintendo DS featuring an expanded roster.

Reception[edit]

Supersonic Warriors[edit]

Supersonic Warriors
Aggregate scores
Aggregator Score
GameRankings 73.47%[7]
Metacritic 73/100[8]
Review scores
Publication Score
Famitsu 29/40[9]
Game Informer 5.5/10[10]
GamePro 3.5/5 stars[11]
GameSpot 7.7/10[12]
GameSpy 3/5 stars[13]
GameZone 7.5/10[6]
IGN 7.5/10[14]
NGC Magazine 59%[15]
Nintendo Power 3.1/5[16]
Nintendo World Report 8/10[17]
The Sydney Morning Herald 3.5/5 stars[18]
The Times 4/5 stars[19]

Supersonic Warriors was met with average reception upon release, as GameRankings gave it a score of 73.47%,[7] while Metacritic gave it 73 out of 100.[8]

Supersonic Warriors 2[edit]

Supersonic Warriors 2
Aggregate scores
Aggregator Score
GameRankings 69.59%[20]
Metacritic 66/100[21]
Review scores
Publication Score
GamePro 3.5/5 stars[22]
GameSpot 6.9/10[23]
GameSpy 3.5/5 stars[24]
GameZone 7/10[25]
IGN 7.5/10[26]
NGC Magazine 68%[27]
Nintendo Power 5/10[28]

Supersonic Warriors 2 was met with a little more mixed reception than the first game; GameRankings gave it a score of 69.59%,[20] while Metacritic gave it 66 out of 100.[21]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors Release Information for Game Boy Advance". GameFAQs. Retrieved June 17, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors 2 Release Information for DS". GameFAQs. Retrieved June 17, 2014. 
  3. ^ a b c Kasavin Greg. (6 JULY 2005). http://www.gamespot.com/articles/dragon-ball-z-supersonic-warriors-sequel-ds-bound/1100-6128607/ CBSInteractive. Retrieved 2014-08-09.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Cavia, Robert. (14 AUG 2004). http://ca.ign.com/games/dragon-ball-z-supersonic-warriors/gba-667042/. Retrieved 2014-08-09.
  5. ^ a b c d "Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors for Game Boy Advance Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved June 17, 2014.
  6. ^ a b Bedigian, Louis (July 8, 2004). "Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors - GBA - Review". GameZone. Archived from the original on April 4, 2009. Retrieved June 17, 2014. 
  7. ^ a b "Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors for Game Boy Advance". GameRankings. Retrieved June 17, 2014. 
  8. ^ a b "Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors for Game Boy Advance Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved June 17, 2014. 
  9. ^ "ドラゴンボールZ 舞空闘劇". Famitsu 798. April 2, 2004. 
  10. ^ Juba, Joe (September 2004). "Dragon Ball Z: Super Sonic Warriors [sic]". Game Informer (137): 118. Archived from the original on January 4, 2008. Retrieved June 17, 2014. 
  11. ^ Test Monkey (June 22, 2004). "Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors Review for Game Boy Advance on GamePro.com". GamePro. Archived from the original on March 10, 2005. Retrieved June 17, 2014. 
  12. ^ Provo, Frank (July 7, 2004). "Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors Review". GameSpot. Retrieved June 17, 2014. 
  13. ^ Steinberg, Steve (July 15, 2004). "GameSpy: Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors". GameSpy. Archived from the original on November 5, 2005. Retrieved June 17, 2014. 
  14. ^ Harris, Craig (June 22, 2004). "Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors". IGN. Retrieved June 17, 2014. 
  15. ^ "Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors". NGC Magazine. November 2004. 
  16. ^ "Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors". Nintendo Power 183: 122. August 2004. 
  17. ^ Cole, Michael (July 11, 2004). "Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors". Nintendo World Report. Retrieved June 17, 2014. 
  18. ^ Hill, Jason (August 26, 2004). "Packing a punch". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved June 17, 2014. 
  19. ^ "Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors". The Times. September 25, 2004. Retrieved June 17, 2014. (subscription required)
  20. ^ a b "Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors 2 for DS". GameRankings. Retrieved June 17, 2014. 
  21. ^ a b "Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors 2 for DS Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved June 17, 2014. 
  22. ^ Rice Burner (November 18, 2005). "Dragon Ball Z Supersonic Warriors 2 Review for DS on GamePro.com". GamePro. Archived from the original on November 25, 2005. Retrieved June 17, 2014. 
  23. ^ Davis, Ryan (December 9, 2005). "Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors 2 Review". GameSpot. Retrieved June 17, 2014. 
  24. ^ Vasconcellos, Eduardo (December 8, 2005). "GameSpy: Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors 2". GameSpy. Retrieved June 17, 2014. 
  25. ^ Bedigian, Louis (December 5, 2005). "Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warrior 2 [sic] - NDS - Review". GameZone. Archived from the original on February 9, 2009. Retrieved June 17, 2014. 
  26. ^ Bozon, Mark (January 26, 2006). "Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors 2 Review". IGN. Retrieved June 17, 2014. 
  27. ^ "Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors 2". NGC Magazine. February 2006. 
  28. ^ "Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors 2". Nintendo Power 200: 114. January 2006. 

External links[edit]