Dragon Warrior Monsters 2

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Dragon Warrior Monsters 2
Tarasbox.jpg
North American box art for the Tara's Adventure version
Developer(s) Tose Co., Ltd.
Publisher(s) Enix
Square Enix (3DS)
Designer(s) Yuji Horii
Artist(s) Akira Toriyama
Composer(s) Koichi Sugiyama
Series Dragon Quest Monsters
Platform(s) Game Boy Color, PlayStation, Nintendo 3DS
Release date(s) Game Boy Color
  • JP March 9, 2001
  • NA September 15, 2001
PlayStation
  • JP May 30, 2002
3DS
  • JP February 6, 2014
Genre(s) Role-playing video game
Mode(s) Single-player
Multiplayer (3DS)
Distribution Cartridge, optical disc

Dragon Warrior Monsters 2, known in Japan as Dragon Quest Monsters 2 (ドラゴンクエストモンスターズ Doragon Kuesuto Monsutāzu Tsū?), is a video game published by Enix for the Game Boy Color.

It is the second Dragon Warrior Monsters game for the Game Boy Color and features two different versions of the same game, Cobi's Journey (released as Dragon Quest Monsters 2: Ruka's Journey in Japan) and Tara's Adventure (released as Dragon Quest Monsters 2: Iru's Adventure in Japan). This was the last Game Boy Color title released in North America that was also compatible with the original Game Boy and enhanced for the Super Game Boy.

Instead of traveling through portals like in the previous game, the player attains keys that lead to different worlds. The only differences in the two versions, aside from the main character, is that there are different monsters the player can find in the wild and different keys for each game. The game also introduced the new monster family, Water.

Both games were remade in 2002 for the PlayStation in a compilation game called Dragon Quest Monsters 1+2 (ドラゴンクエストモンスターズ1・2 星降りの勇者と牧場の仲間たち Doragon Kuesuto Monsutāzu Wan Tsū: Hoshi Furi no Yūsha to Bokujō no Nakamatachi?, lit. "Dragon Quest Monsters 1 2: The Hero From the Stars and the Rancher Friends") and released only in Japan.[1]

The Nintendo 3DS version of both games were also remade in 2014 called Dragon Quest Monsters 2: Iru and Luca's Marvelous Mysterious Key and released only in Japan.

Plot[edit]

Cobi and Tara are both in a family of monster breeders who have come to the Kingdom of Greatlog to make a living. Shortly after they arrive, their mother tells them to pick up a Nut Pie from the Vault. As they are heading towards the Vault, they run into the Prince and his companion Warubou, making trouble for the townspeople. Unfortunately, after they get the pie, it is taken by the Prince and his cohort.[2] Cobi and Tara follow them to a cave underneath the kingdom, where the two are arguing about who should get the goods. Cobi and Tara try to get the pie back but, in the process, knock a big plug out of a hole. The Prince leaves frantically and Warubou uses himself to plug up the hole. He tells Cobi and Tara that the plug allows the island of GreatLog to stay afloat and without it, it will sink. He tells them to get a monster master and ask for his or her assistance. But when they cannot find anyone, Warubou says that they will have to do it. A quest to save the kingdom has now begun.

Gameplay[edit]

Dragon Warrior Monsters 2 allows the player to form a team of monsters from various Dragon Quest games. Controlling either Cobi or Tara, the player begins on Greatlog, where there are various shops, a monster farm, breeding area, and an arena. By advancing in the story, the player is given keys that unlock new worlds from Greatlog, which acts as a base for the player. There are other keys which feature randomly created worlds for the player to explore. In the optional worlds, the player needs to fight a certain number of monsters to reach the final, randomized boss of the world. Some of the worlds feature rare monsters, while some have very common monsters, depending on the name of the key.

There are a few differences in the gameplay in PlayStation compilation Dragon Quest Monsters 1+2. The Tiny Medal system is different and the wandering trainers are much harder to encounter.[3]

Battles are fought in a turn-based system. The player can have three monsters out at a time.[4] Monsters found in the wild can also join the player's team; the last monster defeated always has a small chance of joining. By feeding it different types of meat, the chances rise.

In optional worlds, the player will meet foreign masters, and has the option to battle. The same rules apply, and the player can even capture monsters from other masters. However, the battle music that is played while battling a foreign master is the "Boss" music.

Reception[edit]

On release, Famitsu magazine scored the game a 34 out of 40.[5] According to Famitsu, Dragon Warrior Monsters 2 has sold 1,592,728 copies in Japan.[6] Like Dragon Warrior Monsters before it, this game was immediately compared to Pokémon, a series with similar monster-catching gameplay.[7][8] However, critics established it as more than just a mere "Pokémon clone".[8]

PlayStation compilation Dragon Quest Monsters 1+2 received a 33 out of 40 by Famitsu magazine.[9] The game was the 38th best-selling game of 2002 with 292,275 copies.[10]

Remake[edit]

3DS cover art

Dragon Quest Monsters 2: Iru and Luca's Marvelous Mysterious Key (ドラゴンクエストモンスターズ2 イルとルカの不思議なふしぎな鍵 Doragon Kuesto Monsutāzu 2: Iru to Ruka no Fushigi na Fushigi na Kagi?),[11] is a remake of Dragon Warrior Monsters 2 developed and published by Square Enix exclusively for the Nintendo 3DS. The remake incorporates both Luca's Adventure, and Tara's Journey in one game.[11] [12] The game was released in Japan both as a digital download on the Nintendo eShop, and in retail stores on February 6, 2014. The game also has a special 3DS bundle in Japan as well, which includes both the Dragon Quest Monsters 2 3DS LL, and a physical copy of the game.[12]

As of February 24, 2014 the game has sold 634,433 copies.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "DQM I & II". 2002. Retrieved 5 Oct 2007. 
  2. ^ Torres, Ricardo (2001-06-08). "First Impression". Gamespot.com. Retrieved 2009-10-14. 
  3. ^ Dustin Hubbard and Dwaine Bullock (2002). "Dragon Quest Monsters 1+2". Retrieved 2008-07-23. 
  4. ^ Enix of America, ed. (2001). Dragon Warrior Monsters 2: Cobi's Journey & Tara's Adventure Instruction Booklet. Enix of America. pp. 13–16. 
  5. ^ ゲームボーイ - ドラゴンクエストモンスターズ2 マルタのふしぎな鍵・ルカの旅立ち. Weekly Famitsu. No.915 Pt.2. Pg.110. 30 June 2006.
  6. ^ "Dragon Quest Sales History". Chart Get. 2008-07-31. Retrieved 2009-02-07. 
  7. ^ "RPGFan.com Reviews: DWM 2: Cobi's Journey". RPGFan.com. 2001. Retrieved 2009-10-14. 
  8. ^ a b Goldstein, Hilary (2001-11-08). "IGN: Dragon Warrior Monsters 2". IGN.com. Retrieved 2009-10-14. 
  9. ^ プレイステーション - ドラゴンクエストモンスターズ1・2 星降りの勇者と牧場の仲間たち. Weekly Famitsu. No.915 Pt.2. Pg.18. 30 June 2006.
  10. ^ "2002 Top 50 Japanese Console Game Chart". The-MagicBox.com. Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  11. ^ a b Spencer (July 30, 2013). "Dragon Quest Monsters 2 Is Getting A 3DS Remake, You're Not Surprised Are You?". Siliconera. Retrieved July 30, 2013. 
  12. ^ a b Spencer (November 4, 2013). "Dragon Quest Monsters 2 Is Getting A 3DS Remake, You’re Not Surprised Are YouDragon Quest Monsters 2 Set For February Along With Limited Edition 3DS XL". Siliconera. Retrieved November 4, 2013. 
  13. ^ Handrahan, Matthew (27 February 2014). "Knack beats Yakuza to Japanese number one". GamesIndustry.biz. Gamer Network. Retrieved 1 March 2014. 

External links[edit]