Dragonne

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Dragonne
Dragonne.JPG
Characteristics
Type Magical beast
Image Wizards.com image
Stats Open Game License stats

In the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, the dragonne is a magical beast that looks like a cross between a huge lion and a brass dragon.

Publication history[edit]

The dragonne first appeared in first edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons in the original Monster Manual (1977).[1]

The dragonne appeared in the Dungeons & Dragons Expert adventure modules Quest for the Heartstone (1984) and Savage Coast (1985), and the Creature Catalogue (1986) and Creature Catalog (1993).[2]

The dragonne appeared in second edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons in Monstrous Compendium Volume Two (1989),[3] and reprinted in the Monstrous Manual (1993).[4]

The dragonne appeared in third edition Dungeons & Dragons in the Monster Manual (2000),[5] and in the 3.5 revised Monster Manual (2003).

Description[edit]

From a distance, the dragonne merely looks like a giant lion, with the exception of two metallic wings sprouting from its furred shoulders. upon closer inspection, however it becomes apparent that there is more to the dragonne than is first perceived. The dragonne is encased in a coating of tough, brassy scales and possess a mane of incredibly coarse, wiry hair - not akin to a lion's at all. Huge claws and fangs are also components of this beast's appearance

Ecology[edit]

Dragonnes make their homes in desert areas and live mostly on goats and other herd animals. They rarely attack humanoids.

In the Eberron campaign setting, the dragonne is the heraldic beast of the dragonmarked House Tharashk.

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gygax, Gary. Monster Manual (TSR, 1977)
  2. ^ Nephew, John. Creature Catalog (TSR, 1993)
  3. ^ Cook, David, et al. Monstrous Compendium Volume Two (TSR, 1989)
  4. ^ Stewart, Doug, ed. Monstrous Manual (TSR, 1993)
  5. ^ Monte Cook, Jonathan Tweet, Skip Williams. Monster Manual (Wizards of the Coast, 2000)