Drake Berehowsky

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Drake Berehowsky
Born (1972-01-03) January 3, 1972 (age 42)
Toronto, ON, CAN
Height 6 ft 2 in (188 cm)
Weight 211 lb (96 kg; 15 st 1 lb)
Position Defence
Shot Right
Played for Toronto Maple Leafs
Pittsburgh Penguins
Edmonton Oilers
Nashville Predators
Vancouver Canucks
Phoenix Coyotes
NHL Draft 10th overall, 1990
Toronto Maple Leafs
Playing career 1990–2006

Drake Berehowsky (born January 3, 1972) is a Canadian former professional ice hockey defenceman. He is best known for his time in the National Hockey League (NHL), where he played for the Toronto Maple Leafs, Pittsburgh Penguins, Edmonton Oilers, Nashville Predators, Vancouver Canucks and Phoenix Coyotes.

After his NHL career but before his Solar Bears' coaching job, Berehowsky served as an assistant coach with the Peoria Rivermen for three seasons.

Playing career[edit]

Berehowsky began his junior hockey career with the Kingston Raiders in 1988, and had a very strong rookie season, earning 46 points in 63 games. The Raiders were renamed to the Kingston Frontenacs in 1989–90, however, Berehowsky would only appear in nine games, as he suffered a serious knee injury. He earned 14 points in those nine games, and the Toronto Maple Leafs would draft Berehowsky with their first round draft pick in the 1990 NHL Entry Draft. Berehowsky split the 1990–91 season between the Frontenacs and the North Bay Centennials before earning a late season call-up to the Leafs. He returned to North Bay for the 1991–92 season, recording 82 points in 62 games, before helping the Centennials to the OHL finals, as Berehowsky had 31 points in 21 post-season games. Berehowsky would earn another late season call-up to Toronto, appearing in a single game, before being sent to the St. John's Maple Leafs for the 1992 AHL playoffs, where he recorded five assists in six games.

Berehowsky split the 1992–93 and 1993–94 seasons between St. John's and Toronto before earning a full-time roster spot in Toronto in the 1994–95 season. Berehowsky appeared in 25 games with the Maple Leafs in 1994–95, however, the team traded him to the Pittsburgh Penguins for Grant Jennings on April 7, 1995. Berehowsky would finish the season as the odd man out on the Penguins defense, as he appeared in only four games with the team, and in only one playoff game. In 1995–96, Pittsburgh sent Berehowsky to the Cleveland Lumberjacks, their American Hockey League affiliate for most of the season, as he would only appear in one game with the Penguins. After the season, Berehowsky became a free agent.

He split the 1996–97 season between the Carolina Monarchs of the AHL, and the San Antonio Dragons of the International Hockey League, and on September 30, 1997, he would sign an NHL contract with the Edmonton Oilers. Berehowsky spent most of the season with the Oilers, as he appeared in 67 regular season and 12 post-season games with the club, however, he did see some time with the Hamilton Bulldogs of the AHL, playing in 8 games.

On October 1, 1998, the Oilers traded Berehowsky, Éric Fichaud and Greg de Vries to the Nashville Predators for Mikhail Shtalenkov and Jim Dowd. Berehowsky would play with the Predators until 2001, having a career season in 1999–2000, when he scored 12 goals and 32 points, leading the Nashville defense in goals. On March 9, 2001, the Predators dealt Berehowsky to the Vancouver Canucks.

Berehowsky's time with the Canucks was short, as he would once again be traded on December 28, 2001, as Vancouver traded Berehowsky and Denis Pederson to the Phoenix Coyotes for Todd Warriner, Trevor Letowski and Tyler Bouck. Berehowsky saw regular time on the Coyotes blueline, helping them to the post-season. An injury suffered in training camp sidelined Berehowsky for most of the 2002–03 season, as he only appeared in seven games with Phoenix, and two with the Springfield Falcons of the AHL before becoming a free agent after the season.

He signed with the Pittsburgh Penguins, where he played from 1994–1996, on August 29, 2003, and after 47 games with the team, Berehowsky would once again be on the move, as on February 11, 2004, the Penguins traded Berehowsky to his original NHL team, the Toronto Maple Leafs for Ric Jackman, where he finished out the season.

With the NHL in a lockout for the 2004–05 season, Berehowsky signed with Skellefteå AIK in Sweden for the season, before signing a contract with Eisbären Berlin in Germany for the 2005–06 season. After the season with Berlin, Berehowsky returned to North America, where he signed with the San Antonio Rampage of the AHL, before retiring from hockey in the summer of 2006.

Head coaching career[edit]

On June 19, 2012, Berehowsky was named Head Coach of the Orlando Solar Bears for their inaugural season in the ECHL.[1] In this 2012-2013 season, Berehowsky lead the expansion team's dynamic roster that listed a total of 56 players during the year to a record of 28 wins, 37 losses, 3 Overtime losses, & 4 shootout losses totalling 63 points; second last place in the 14 team Eastern Conference, with only three teams finishing with fewer points in the then 23 team league.[2][3]

Global Lethbridge's Paul Kingsmith announced June 4, 2013, Berehowsky is going to be the next head coach for the Lethbridge Hurricanes (WHL). During his first season with the club, the Berehowsky lead Hurricanes finished with 16 fewer wins and 37 fewer points than the previous season. The team missed the playoffs for the fifth consecutive season and set the franchise record for fewest wins (12) and fewest points (29) in the 26 season Lethbridge Hurricanes history as well as the 47 year franchise history.[4][5][6]Fired Dec 9 2014[7]

Career statistics[edit]

    Regular Season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1988–89 Kingston Raiders OHL 63 7 39 46 85
1989–90 Kingston Frontenacs OHL 9 3 11 14 28
1990–91 Kingston Frontenacs OHL 13 5 13 18 38
1990–91 North Bay Centennials OHL 26 7 23 30 51 10 2 7 9 21
1990–91 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 8 0 1 1 25
1991–92 North Bay Centennials OHL 62 19 63 82 147 21 7 24 31 22
1991–92 St. John's Maple Leafs AHL 6 0 5 5 21
1991–92 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 1 0 0 0 0
1992–93 St. John's Maple Leafs AHL 28 10 17 27 38
1992–93 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 41 4 15 19 61
1993–94 St. John's Maple Leafs AHL 18 3 12 15 40
1993–94 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 49 2 8 10 63
1994–95 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 25 0 2 2 15
1994–95 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 4 0 0 0 13 1 0 0 0 0
1995–96 Cleveland Lumberjacks IHL 74 6 28 34 141 3 0 3 3 6
1995–96 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 1 0 0 0 0
1996–97 Carolina Monarchs AHL 49 2 15 17 55
1996–97 San Antonio Dragons IHL 16 3 4 7 36
1997–98 Hamilton Bulldogs AHL 8 2 0 2 21
1997–98 Edmonton Oilers NHL 67 1 6 7 169 12 1 2 3 14
1998–99 Nashville Predators NHL 74 2 15 17 140
1999–00 Nashville Predators NHL 79 12 20 32 87
2000–01 Nashville Predators NHL 66 6 18 24 100
2000–01 Vancouver Canucks NHL 14 1 1 2 21 4 0 0 0 12
2001–02 Vancouver Canucks NHL 25 1 2 3 18
2001–02 Phoenix Coyotes NHL 32 1 4 5 42 5 0 1 1 4
2002–03 Springfield Falcons AHL 2 0 0 0 0
2002–03 Phoenix Coyotes NHL 7 1 2 3 27
2003–04 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 47 5 16 21 50
2003–04 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 9 1 2 3 17
2004–05 Skellefteå AIK Swe.1 8 1 0 1 49
2005–06 San Antonio Rampage AHL 18 0 1 1 23
2005–06 Eisbären Berlin DEL 19 3 12 15 18 11 1 1 2 12
OHL totals 173 41 149 190 349 31 9 31 40 43
NHL totals 549 37 112 149 848 22 1 3 4 30

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Preceded by
John Uniac
Jack Ferguson Award
1988
Succeeded by
Eric Lindros
Preceded by
Steve Bancroft
Toronto Maple Leafs first round draft pick
1990
Succeeded by
Brandon Convery