Draw (terrain)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
An example of a draw on a topographical map, and how it would look in the real world. If you are standing in a draw, the ground slopes upward in three directions and downward in the other direction.
Typical draw, Little Carpathians

A draw (US) or re-entrant (international), is a terrain feature formed by two parallel ridges or spurs with low ground in between them. The area of low ground itself is the draw, and it is defined by the spurs surrounding it. Draws are similar to valleys on a smaller scale, however while valleys are by nature parallel to a ridgeline, a draw is perpendicular to the ridge, and rises with the surrounding ground, disappearing up-slope. A draw is usually etched in a hillside by water flow, and often contains a stream or loose rocks from eroded rockfall.

A draw differs from a valley or an arroyo, in that the ground always slopes downward from a draw in only one direction, and upward in the other three; while in a valley or arroyo there is noticeable upward slope in only two directions. The slope on a draw is generally quite sharp, with a clearly established fall line and characterized by a generally steep vertical drop over a short horizontal distance.

See also[edit]