Dream Zone

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Dream Zone
Dream Zone Cover.jpg
Amiga version cover art
Developer(s) JAM Software
Publisher(s) Baudville
Distributor(s) Leisuresoft[1]
Programmer(s) Andy Gavin
Artist(s) Jason Rubin
Platform(s) Apple IIGS, Amiga, Atari ST and MS-DOS
Release date(s) 1987[2]
Genre(s) Adventure
Mode(s) Single-player
Distribution Two 800KB floppy disks

Dream Zone is an adventure video game developed by JAM Software (later known as Naughty Dog) published by Baudville, and released in 1987 for the Apple IIGS and then ported to the Amiga, Atari ST and PC.

Plot[edit]

The player becomes trapped in his own dream, thanks to a scientist's rotten elixir, and must escape the weird world of his own imagination to reach reality again. The dream is full of nightmarish creatures and contains magic, airships, a floating castle, and a troublesome bureaucracy.[3]

Reception[edit]

Compute! stated that the game "truly conveys a dream-like feeling". The magazine praised its satire and the IIGS version's graphics, and stated that "it's hard to believe that the program was written by two high school juniors".[4] A later Compute! review praised the graphics, story, and interface.[5] The game was reviewed in 1988 in Dragon #134 by Hartley, Patricia, and Kirk Lesser in "The Role of Computers" column. The reviewers gave the game 5 out of 5 stars.[3]

The game sold upwards of 10,000 copies, earning the developers about $15,000.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Dream Zone Cover". 
  2. ^ a b Moriarty, Colin (4 October 2013). "Rising to Greatness: The History of Naughty Dog". IGN. Ziff Davis. Retrieved 31 December 2013. 
  3. ^ a b Lesser, Hartley; Lesser, Patricia; Lesser, Kirk (June 1988). "The Role of Computers". Dragon (134): 80–86. 
  4. ^ Trunzo, James V. (May 1988). "Dream Zone". Compute!. p. 65. Retrieved 10 November 2013. 
  5. ^ Addams, Shay (October 1989). "Nightmare on Game Street". Compute!. p. 106. Retrieved 11 November 2013. 

External links[edit]