Dreyfus Prize in the Chemical Sciences

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The Dreyfus Prize in the Chemical Sciences is an award given to an individual researcher in chemistry. The prize, awarded biennially, consists of a citation, a medal, and a monetary award of $250,000. The prize is awarded by The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc. to an individual in a selected area of chemistry "to recognize exceptional and original research that has advanced the field in a major way."

The first Dreyfus Prize was awarded in 2009 to George M. Whitesides of Harvard University in the field of materials chemistry,[1] honoring the accomplishments of the Dreyfus brothers, Camille and Henry, who founded Celanese.

The 2011 Dreyfus Prize was awarded to Tobin J. Marks of Northwestern University in the field of catalysis.

The 2013 Dreyfus Prize was awarded to R. Graham Cooks of Purdue University in the field of chemical instrumentation.

Eligibility[edit]

Nobel laureates are not eligible. Dreyfus Foundation Advisors and reviewers who serve in the year of the selection are not eligible.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Harvard chemist accepts Dreyfus Prize for Chemical Sciences". Cambridge Chronicle (WickedLocal.com). October 3, 2009. Retrieved 2 April 2010. 

External links[edit]