Dried meat

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Dried meat is a feature of many cuisines around the world. Examples include:

  • Bakkwa or rougan, Chinese salty-sweet dried meat sheets.
  • Biltong, a cured meat that originated in South Africa.
  • Bindenfleisch, air-dried meat of Switzerland.
  • Bògoǫ, a dried and smoked meat, often caribou, of the Dené people of northern Canada.
  • Borts, air-dried strips horse or cow meat used as travel food or to last the winter in Mongolia. Often ground into powder and mixed with water to create soup.[1]
  • Bresaola, air-dried salted beef originally from the Valtellina valley in northern Italy.
  • Carne-de-sol, sun-dried salt beef from Brazil.
  • Carne seca, air-dried meat from Mexico.
  • Cecina, lightly smoked, dried, and salted meat from northwestern Spain (Asturias, León, Cantabria), Cuba, and Mexico.
  • Charqui, made from llama or alpaca, in South America.[2]
  • Chipped beef, partially dried beef sold in small, thin, flexible leaves in jars or plastic packets.
  • Hunter beef, a corned beef from Pakistan marinated and baked for use in sandwiches and salads.
  • Jerky, meat that has been trimmed of fat, cut into strips, marinated, and dried or smoked.
  • Kuivaliha, air-dried salted meat (often reindeer) of northern Finland.
  • Lahndi or qadid, air-dried salted meat (often lamb) in northern Afghanistan.
  • Pastırma, Turkish air-dried salted and often spiced meat.
  • Pemmican, a meat mixture, sometimes with dried fruit, used by the native peoples of North America.
  • Suho meso, a smoked beef eaten in Bosnia.
  • Sukuti, air dried, spiced meat of the Newari community of Nepal.

See also[edit]

References[edit]