Drivers' working hours

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Drivers' working hours is the commonly used term for regulations that govern the activities of the drivers of commercial goods vehicles and passenger carrying vehicles.

Within the European Union, EU Regulation 561/2006 [1][1][2] is the current regulation concerning the driving times, breaks and rest periods required to be taken by drivers of goods or passenger vehicles who drive in the EU. In certain circumstances, drivers may be exempt from EU Regulation 561/2006 throughout the EU, or there may be a derogation for the driver on a national journey within a particular country.

If the vehicle has passed through an AETR signatory country during the course of its journey then it will fall within scope of AETR rules for the whole of that journey.

Since September 2010, AETR rules have been amended to align closely with EU Regulation 561/2006.

Under certain circumstances, drivers may instead fall within scope of the domestic rules of that country.

In addition to the above requirements, drivers in the EU must also abide with the European Working Time Directive 2003/88/EC.

EU countries[edit]

Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta,

Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

AETR countries[edit]

Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Kazakhstan, Liechtenstein, Macedonia, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, Russia, San Marino,

Serbia, Switzerland, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine and Uzbekistan.

EEA countries[edit]

All the EU countries plus:

Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway.

Tachograph[edit]

An approved tachograph is the required instrument by which the activity of drivers subject to the EU or AETR drivers’ hours rules, the vehicle’s speed and distance, and the time are recorded. There are two main types of tachograph – analogue and digital.[3]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

Footnotes[edit]