Drop Stop

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Drop Stop logo

Drop Stop is a patented[1] device designed to prevent items from falling down in between a car's front seats and center console. It was invented by Marc Newburger and Jeffrey Simon of Los Angeles.[2]

Drop Stop is constructed out of black Neoprene[3] filled with polyester fiberfill[4] and is about 17 inches long.[5] It has a slot sewn into it where the seat belt latch can fit through. This anchors the device, allowing the car seat to slide back-and-forth freely.[6] According to Newburger and Simon, the space between the center console and the front seats is always in dark shadow and thus the black color of Drop Stop matches any car's interior.[7] Provided that the gap between a car's center console and seat is less than 3.5 inches, Drop Stop should fit.[5] However, some cars, for example the BMW M3 and Volkswagen Jetta, don’t have enough space in the gap to fit the Drop Stop in place.[8]

The idea was born after the inventors dropped a mobile phone down the gap while driving and almost caused a serious accident trying to retrieve it.[9][10]

Drop Stop was featured on a segment of The Marilyn Denis Show entitled "The Best As Seen on TV Products".[11] Drop Stop was also featured on ABC's The View on a special Shark Tank episode where the product was introduced by Lori Greiner alongside the inventors.[12] First airing on March 29, 2013, Newburger and Simon appeared on Shark Tank where they made a deal with Greiner for 20% equity in Drop Stop for $300,000.[13] On a followup episode of Shark Tank airing on November 22, 2013, Drop Stop announced a $2,000,000 purchase order with Walmart.[14] On March 19, 2014, Newburger and Simon were featured with their invention on The Queen Latifah Show where they were referred to as "some of Lori’s most successful inventors."[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "APPARATUS FOR CLOSING GAPS". USPTO. 4 March 2009. Retrieved 7 November 2012. 
  2. ^ "Inventors Have Solution To Vehicles' Black Holes". Los Angeles: CBS Broadcasting Inc. 3 December 2009. Retrieved 22 December 2009. 
  3. ^ Kritsonis, Ted (7 March 2012). "How to prevent your stuff from slipping through the car's cracks". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 10 March 2012. 
  4. ^ Markley, Stephen (16 April 2009). "Drop Stop Prevents Items From Falling Under Your Seat". Miami: The Miami Herald. Archived from the original on 16 April 2009l. Retrieved 11 February 2010. 
  5. ^ a b Keegan, Matt (24 October 2011). "Product Review: Drop Stop". Auto Trends. Retrieved 5 January 2012. 
  6. ^ Braun Davison, Candace (22 August 2013). "Car Organization Tips: How To Declutter Your Car". Huffington Post. This neoprene wedge has a slot that fits around the seatbelt buckle, and it moves with the seat, so it won't become the gap's newest victim if you need to move forward a few inches. 
  7. ^ Romero, Ric (18 December 2009). "Invention blocks drops into console crevice". Los Angeles: ABC Inc. Retrieved 22 December 2009. 
  8. ^ "Automotive Accessories: How to Keep Your Car Nicer Longer - Gear Box". Car and Driver. September 2009. Retrieved 22 December 2009. 
  9. ^ Lamas, Jonathan. "The Original Drop Stop Car Wedge". About.com. Retrieved 22 December 2009. 
  10. ^ "Car Accessory Aim to Reduce Crashes". AAA. August 2009. Retrieved 11 February 2010. 
  11. ^ Khachi, Ramsin. "The Best "As Seen on TV Products"". The Marilyn Denis Show. Retrieved 17 February 2012. 
  12. ^ "Products With the Sharks". YouTube. 22 February 2013. Retrieved 20 March 2013. 
  13. ^ "Episode 419". Shark Tank. ABC. 29 March 2013. Retrieved 4 April 2013. 
  14. ^ "Recap of Shark Tank Season 5, Episode 10". In The Shark Tank. 25 November 2013. Retrieved 6 December 2013.  |first1= missing |last1= in Authors list (help)
  15. ^ ""Shark Tank" Success Stories". The Queen Latifah Show. Retrieved 19 March 2014. Shark Tank‘s Lori Greiner and Queen Latifah caught up with some of Lori’s most successful inventors — the creators of “Drop Stop” Jeffrey Simon and Marc Newburger, and the creator of “CordaRoys” Byron Young. 

External links[edit]