Dru C. Gladney

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Dru C. Gladney, recent President of the Pacific Basin Institute at Pomona College, is currently Professor of Anthropology at Pomona College. Gladney is the author of four books and more than 100 academic articles and book chapters on topics spanning the Asian continent. He received his Ph.D. in Social Anthropology from the University of Washington, Seattle, in 1987.

Dr. Gladney focuses his research on ethnic and cultural nationalism in Asia, specializing in the peoples, politics, and cultures of the Silk Road and Muslim Chinese (or Hui). A two-time Fulbright Research Scholar to China and Turkey, he has conducted long-term field research in Western China, Central Asia, and Turkey, for more than 25 years. His research languages include Mandarin Chinese, Turkish, Uyghur, Uzbek, Kazakh, and Russian. The results of his work have been featured on CNN, BBC,[1] Voice of America, National Public Radio,[2] al-Jazeerah, and in Newsweek, Time, the Washington Post, International Herald Tribune, Los Angeles Times and the New York Times. Dr. Gladney’s publications have been translated into Chinese, Japanese, Russian, Arabic, Turkish, French, and German.

Gladney’s most recent book is Dislocating China: Muslims, Minorities, and Other Subaltern Subjects.[3] He is also the author of: Muslim Chinese: Ethnic Nationalism in the People's Republic"[4] and Ethnic Identity in China: The Making of a Muslim Minority Nationality;[5] and the editor of Making Majorities: Constituting the Nation in Japan, China, Korea, Malaysia, Fiji, Turkey, and the U.S.[6] Gladney has held faculty positions and post-doctoral fellowships at Harvard University; the University of Southern California; King's College, Cambridge, the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton; the East-West Center, Honolulu; and the University of Hawai’i at Manoa. He has been a consultant to the Soros Foundation, Ford Foundation, World Bank, Asian Development Bank, Getty Museum, National Academy of Sciences, European Center for Conflict Prevention, U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, and UNESCO.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Deadly attack on police in China's Xinjiang province". BBC News. 18 July 2011. 
  2. ^ "After Uighur Attacks, Understanding Muslims in China". 
  3. ^ Gladney, Dru (2004). Dislocating China: Muslims, Minorities, and Other Subaltern Subjects. Chicago: University of Chicago. ISBN 0-226-29775-6. 
  4. ^ Gladney, Dru (1991). Muslim Chinese: Ethnic Nationalism in the People's Republic. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. ISBN 0-674-59497-5. 
  5. ^ Gladney, Dru. Ethnic Identity in China: The Making of a Muslim Minority Nationality. Wadsworth. ISBN 0-534-06698-4. 
  6. ^ Gladney, Dru (1998). Making Majorities: Constituting the Nation in Japan, China, Korea, Malaysia, Fiji, Turkey, and the U.S. Stanford: Stanford. ISBN 0-8047-3048-2. 
  7. ^ "Interview with Professor Dru Gladney". 

External links[edit]