Bhutan Peace and Prosperity Party

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Bhutan Peace and Prosperity Party
Leader Pema Gyamtsho
Founded July 25, 2007
Headquarters Chang Lam, Thimphu
Colors Brown
Seats in the National Assembly
15 / 47
Website
http://www.dpt.bt/
Politics of Bhutan
Political parties
Elections

The Bhutan Peace and Prosperity Party,[1] or Druk Phuensum Tshogpa (Dzongkha: འབྲུག་ཕུན་སུམ་ཚོགས་པ; Wylie: 'brug phun-sum tshog-pa), is one of the major political parties in Bhutan. It was formed on July 25, 2007 as a merger of the All People's Party and the Bhutan People's United Party,[2] which were both short-lived. The working committee of the merged entity, headed by the former home minister, Jigmi Yoezer Thinley, decided on the name for the new party. On August 15, 2007, Jigmi Yoezer Thinley was elected president of the party. The party applied for registration on August 15, 2007, thus becoming the second political party in Bhutan to do so. On October 2, 2007, the Election Commission of Bhutan registered the party.[3] On March 24, 2008, the party won the first general election held in Bhutan. The party secured 45 of the 47 seats to the National Assembly.[4][5]

But in General Election 2013, while DPT secured 15 seats, this party lost the position of Ruling Party. In this election, People's Democratic Party won 32 seats and became ruling party.[6] In July 2013 Jigme Thinley submitted the resignation for the Member of National Assembly before beginning its Legislative Session. So on July 24 same year Pema Gyamtsho who is former Minister of Agriculture and Forest was appointed the Opposition Leader in NA for the Second Legislative Session.[7] On December 3 same year he was also elected as the new DPT’s Party President.[8]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Matthew Rosenberg, "Royalist Party Wins Election in Bhutan", Associated Press, March 24, 2008.[dead link]
  2. ^ Druk Phuensuim Tshogpa, the new party in town
  3. ^ Election Commission of Bhutan website-DPT
  4. ^ "Bhutan voters show their attachment to king". International Herald Tribune. Archived from the original on 27 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-03-24. 
  5. ^ "Royalists Win Election in Bhutan". Time (magazine). Archived from the original on 1 May 2008. Retrieved 2008-03-28. 
  6. ^ National Parliamentary Election 2013: General Elections, Election Commission of Bhutan Official Homepage. Retrieved March 16, 2014.
  7. ^ Dr. Pema Gyamtsho to head the OppositionBhutan Broadcasting Service (BBS), July 24, 2013. Retrieved March 16, 2014.
  8. ^ OL, the new DPT president BBS, December 4, 2013. Retrieved March 16, 2014.

External links[edit]