Drum Beat

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Drum Beat
Directed by Delmer Daves
Written by Delmer Daves
Starring Alan Ladd
Music by Victor Young
Cinematography J. Peverell Marley
Production
  company
Jaguar Productions
Distributed by Warner Bros.
Release date(s) April 18, 1955
Running time 111 min.
Country United States
Language English
Box office $3 million (US)[1]

Drum Beat is a 1954 CinemaScope western film written and directed by Delmer Daves and co-produced by Daves and Alan Ladd in his first film for his Jaguar Productions company. Ladd stars along with Audrey Dalton, Charles Bronson as Captain Jack, and Hayden Rorke as President Ulysses S. Grant.[2]

Filmed in Sedona, Arizona,[3] the story uses elements of the 1873 Modoc War in its narrative, with Ladd playing a white man asked by the U.S. Army to attempt negotiations with Native Modocs who are about to wage war.

In his first role, Charles Bronson (originally known as Buchinsky) plays Captain Jack as a memorable villain wearing the coat of a deceased US Cavalry Captain. After murdering General Edward Canby (Warner Anderson) during a peace negotiation, Bronson puts on the late General's coat and announces to the audience "Me GENERAL Jack now!"

Plot[edit]

In 1872, veteran Indian fighter Johnny MacKay is sent for by then President Grant. He tells government officials in Washington about hostilities between settlers, soldiers and Modoc renegades near the California and Oregon border. He is appointed peace commissioner for the territory.

On the way west, Johnny gives an escort to Nancy Meek, a retired army colonel's niece. Nancy is traveling to a ranch owned by her aunt and uncle. There is an ambush outside Sacramento during which the sweetheart of their stage driver Bill Satterwhite is killed by a Modoc renegade. Later they find Nancy's aunt and uncle murdered and the ranch burned.

The grown children of an old Modoc chief, Toby (Winema) and Manok, meet Johnny at Fort Klamath. They tell Johnny it is a chief who calls himself Captain Jack and a band of renegades who are responsible for the brutality while most of the other Modoc wish to live in peace. They both served as intermediaries for the Modoc.

Toby and Manok take Johnny and others to a peace talks near Lost River to discuss violations of the peace treaty signed by the Modoc in 1864 in hopes of bringing about peace again. When the violations are being discussed between Johnny and Captain Jack a vengeance crazed Satterwhite opens fire and kills the brave who killed his woman. A rampage results in which the renegades massacre 18 settlers. The Army responds but is unable to dislodge the renegade Modoc from their mountain stronghold and are forced to retreat with several casualties. After hearing of the massacre and the Army defeat President Grant orders General Canby's to act as a defensive force only.

Once more peace talks were arranged but Toby and Manok warn of treachery. General Canby, Dr. Thomas, a Modoc sympathizer, Johnny and friend Mr. Dyar are to come unarmed but Johnny and Mr. Dyar come armed with revolvers hidden under their shirts. During the negotiations Captain Jack pulls a hidden revolver and kills the General as other Modoc pull theirs and start firing. Dr. Thomas is also killed. Johnny is shot but only wounded and unconscious and is about to be scalped when Toby tries to shield him from harm and is killed. Mr. Dyar escapes in a hail of bullets. The Army responds causing Captain Jack and the other Modoc to retreat back to their stronghold before Johnny can be killed.

President Grant is forced to act because of the public outcry and orders Johnny to do whatever is necessary to bring Captain Jack to justice. The renegades are eventually dislodged from their stronghold and are forced to split up into separate groups. Soon most of the Modoc surrender leaving Captain Jack to survive on his own. He and Johnny have a shootout and hand to hand combat. Johnny prevails and places him under arrest. Captain Jack is jail, put on trial and sentence to hang. Afterwards Johnny returns to the woman he has fallen in love with, Nancy.

In the actual events of the Modoc war of 1873 Modoc Toby (Winema) Riddle doesn't die and saves the life of severely wounded Alfred B. Meachcham who was an American Methodist minister, reformer, and served as the U.S. Superintendent of Indian Affairs for Oregon (1869–1872). At the time of the Peace Tent assassinations he was chairman of the Modoc Peace Commission. Toby (Winema) Riddle was one of the few Native American women to be honored by the US Congress authorizing a military pension for her because of her heroism and service. She lived until 1920. There are varying accounts of Captain Jacks capture/surrender but it is sufficient to say that he was hanged.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

The film was the first production from Ladd's own company, Jaguar.[4]

Marisa Pavan and Audrey Dalton were signed to three picture contracts with Jaguar.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 'The Top Box-Office Hits of 1955', Variety Weekly, January 25, 1956
  2. ^ http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title.jsp?stid=16716
  3. ^ http://www.sedonamonthly.com/gonehollywood/drumbeat.html
  4. ^ PARAMOUNT BUYS O'NEILL CLASSIC: H. L. Davis Will Adapt 'Desire Under the Elms' for Film -- 'Bullfight' Purchased By THOMAS M. PRYOR Special to The New York Times.. New York Times (1923-Current file) [New York, N.Y] 13 May 1954: 34.
  5. ^ Farley Granger Summer Stock Star; Broadway Hit Goes to La Jolla Schallert, Edwin. Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) [Los Angeles, Calif] 15 June 1954: B7.

External links[edit]