Dublin Senior Hurling Championship

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Dublin Senior Hurling Championship
Current season or competition:
2013 Dublin Senior Hurling Championship
Irish Craobh Sinsear Iomána Átha Cliath
Code Hurling
Founded 1887
Region Colours of Dublin.svg Dublin (GAA)
No. of teams 16 (2013)
Title holders Ballyboden St Endas (6th title)
Most titles Faughs (31 titles)
Sponsors Evening Herald
TV partner(s) TG4
Official website hill16.ie

The Dublin Senior Hurling Championship (Irish: Craobh Sinsear Iomána Átha Cliath) is an annual hurling competition organised by the Dublin County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) since 1887 for the top hurling clubs in County Dublin, Ireland. Contested by 16 clubs, it operates on a round-robin system followed by a knock-out phase. The group stages run from April to May and do not resume until August or September to accommodate the All-Ireland Championship. The knock-out stages take place during the months of October and November. Sponsored by the Evening Herald, it is therefore officially known as the Evening Herald Dublin Senior Hurling Championship.

Since the establishment of the Dublin Senior Hurling Championship in 1887, a total of 26 clubs have won the tournament. Faughs have been the most successful club having won 31 titles. The current title holders are Ballyboden St Endas who won the 2013 tournament.[1]

History[edit]

Origins[edit]

The game of hurling has been played in Dublin long since before the foundation of the Dublin Senior Hurling Championship and the GAA. According to Irish historian James Ware (1594–1666), it was customary in the 13th century for the inhabitants of Dublin to organise hurling matches on festive days. On Easter Monday 1209, hundreds of Dublin citizens left the safety of the city walls and descended on the woods near Cullenswood, now Ranelagh, for a hurling match. Tragically, the hurlers and spectators were ambushed by rival clans who had come down from the Wicklow Mountains. Over three hundred Dubliners (including women and children) were slaughtered in the 1209 Cullenswood massacre. This day was commemorated by the citizens of Dublin for many centuries afterwards and became known as Black Monday.[2][3]

Other early written accounts of hurling matches in Dublin include several 18th century newspaper reports. According to these reports, the most popular hurling venues in Dublin at that time were the Crumlin Commons, Irishtown Green and Phoenix Park. One such account recalls a match which took place on the Crumlin Commons in May 1748, where a selection of hurlers from Leinster defeated 20 hurlers from Munster. In a re-match a month later, the Leinster hurlers proved their worth by beating the Munster selection for a second time.[4] Another report describes a hurling match which took place on Irishtown Green in 1757. The game was held between married men and bachelors for a wager of 50 guineas a side.[5] The tradition of a 'married versus singles' hurling match is still staged by many Dublin hurling clubs on St. Stephen's Day.[6] An account from 1792 describes a hurling match which took place in Phoenix Park in front of what was described as a vast concourse of spectators. The report claims that the game had to be abandoned before full-time because the spectators forced their way onto the playing ground.[7]

Foundation[edit]

The game of hurling illustrated by the Dublin Metropolitan Hurling Club in 1884.

The organisation of hurling clubs in Dublin also predates the foundation of the GAA. In 1882, Michael Cusack attended the first meeting of the 'Dublin Hurling Club', formed "for the purpose of taking steps to re-establish the national game of hurling". In September 1883, Cusack began to organise hurling practices in Phoenix Park on Saturday afternoons. The game had long been lost to the city and to most of the remaining parts of the country as well.– As a consequence, just four men turned up on that first Saturday. Slowly the numbers grew, with intrigued spectators joining in. Eventually, Cusack had sufficient numbers to found 'Cusack's Academy Hurling Club' which, in turn, led to the establishment of the Metropolitan Hurling Club. Cusack then established a hurling club in his school on Gardiner Place in October 1883. Immediately, the two clubs began to play matches against each other. A report, written by Cusack, records a game’ played in December 1883: ‘"During the third and fourth quarters the hurling became so fast and furious, the goals were so threatened on the one hand and defended on the other, that spectators expected to be called on after each charge to help the disabled to Steeven’s Hospital.’" On Easter Monday 1884, the Metropolitans played Killimor, in Galway. The game had to be stopped on numerous occasions as the two teams were playing to different rules. It was this clash of styles that convinced Cusack that not only did the rules of the games need to be standardised, but that a body must be established to govern Irish sports.[8][9]

On Saturday, 1 November 1884, the GAA was founded in Hayes' Hotel, Thurles, County Tipperary.[10] Michael Cusack was among the founding members present that day. From then on, Gaelic games adopted a more structured approach and were governed in each county by a separate body known as the county board. The Dublin County Board was set up in 1886 and within a year had organised a hurling competition known today as the Dublin Senior Hurling Championship. In 1887, the first Dublin Senior Hurling Championship was played out and was won by the Metropolitans, previously formed by Cusack in 1883.[11]

Records and statistics[edit]

The Dublin Senior Hurling Championship has been contested 124 times since its inception in 1887. The first team to win the tournament was the Metropolitans, who, after a short never won the title again. The most successful club in the history of the Dublin Senior Hurling Championship has been Faughs who have won the competition on 31 occasions, their last title captured in 1999. St Vincents, who are the most successful football club in Dublin, are second with a total of 13 titles, their last in 1993. The record for most consecutive titles is held by Commercials, Garda and more recently Ballyboden St Endas who each secured a five-in-a-row between the years 1895-99, 1925–29 and 2007-2011 respectively.[12]

Ballyboden St Enda's won 5 consecutive titles since 2007 and contested a total of 8 finals in the last 10 years. In 2009, they won the double, claiming both the hurling and football championship. This was the first time that a Dublin club had won the double since St Vincents had achieved it in 1981.[13]

Roll of honour[edit]

Club Wins Years won
Faughs
31
1892, 1900, 1901, 1903, 1904, 1906, 1910, 1911, 1914, 1915, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1930, 1936, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1950, 1952, 1970, 1972, 1973, 1986, 1987, 1992, 1999
St Vincents
13
1953, 1954, 1955, 1957, 1960, 1962, 1964, 1967, 1975, 1981, 1982, 1988, 1993
Commercials
9
1895, 1896, 1897, 1898, 1899, 1905, 1907, 1909, 1916
UCD
8
1934, 1947, 1948, 1961, 1968, 2000, 2004, 2005
O'Tooles
8
1969, 1977, 1984, 1990, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2002
Garda
6
1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1929, 1931
Young Irelands
6
1932, 1937, 1942, 1943, 1949, 1965
Ballyboden St Endas
6
2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2013
Craobh Chiaráin
5
1971, 1998, 2001, 2003, 2006
Kilmacud Crokes
5
1966, 1974, 1976, 1985, 2012
Kickhams
4
1889, 1890, 1908, 1924
Rapparees
3
1891, 1894, 1912
Collegians
3
1917, 1918, 1919
Army Metro
3
1933, 1935, 1938
Cuala
3
1989, 1991, 1994
New Irelands
2
1958, 1959
Crumlin
2
1978, 1979
Metropolitans
1
1887
Davitts
1
1893
Thomas Davis
1
1913
Eoghan RuadhsA
1
1951
St ColumbasB
1
1956
Junior Board Selection
1
1963
CrokesC
1
1966
St Brendans
1
1980
Erins Isle
1
1983

No competition: 1888, 1902.[12]

A: Eoghan Ruadhs Hurling Club and St Oliver Plunketts Football Club amalgamated to form St Oliver Plunketts/Eoghan Ruadh GAA in 1960.

B: St Columbas Hurling Club and St Agnes Football Club amalgamated to form Crumlin GAA in 1970.

C: Crokes Hurling Club and Kilmacud Football Club amalgamated to form Kilmacud Crokes GAA in 1966.

Finals[edit]

Year Winners Runners-up
2013[14] Ballyboden St Endas 0-13 Lucan Sarsfields 0-10
2012[15] Kilmacud Crokes 2-10 Cuala 0-09
2011[16] Ballyboden St Endas 3-12 O'Toole's 0-09
2010 Ballyboden St Endas 3-17 St Vincents 1-10
2009 Ballyboden St Endas 1-16 Craobh Chiaráin 1-12
2008 Ballyboden St Endas 0-17 Kilmacud Crokes 0-07
2007 Ballyboden St Endas 2-13 St Vincents 1-05
2006 Craobh Chiaráin 2-10 Ballyboden St Endas 2-8
2005 UCD St Vincents
2004 UCD Ballyboden St Endas
2003 Craobh Chiaráin St Brigids
2002 O'Toole's Craobh Chiaráin
2001 Craobh Chiaráin Ballyboden St Endas
2000 UCD St Vincents
1999 Faughs Craobh Chiaráin
1998 Craobh Chiaráin 4-16 Crumlin 2-21
1997 O'Toole's St Vincents
1996 O'Toole's Kilmacud Crokes
1995 O'Toole's St Vincents
1994 Cuala Crumlin
1993 St Vincents Crumlin
1992 Faughs Craobh Chiaráin
1991 Cuala Craobh Chiaráin
1990 O'Toole's St Vincents
1989 Cuala St Vincents
1988 St Vincents Ballyboden St Endas
1987 Faughs Cuala
1986 Faughs Erins Isle
1985 Kilmacud Crokes O'Toole's
1984 O'Toole's Kilmacud Crokes
1983 Erins Isle Ballyboden St Endas
1982 St Vincents O'Toole's
1981 St Vincents O'Toole's
1980 St Brendans Faughs
1979 Crumlin St Brendans
1978 Crumlin Faughs
1977 O'Toole's Faughs
1976 Kilmacud Crokes Craobh Chiaráin
1975 St Vincents Craobh Chiaráin
1974 Kilmacud Crokes Faughs
1973 Faughs
1972 Faughs
1971 Craobh Chiaráin St Vincents
1970 Faughs
1969 O'Tooles Faughs
1968 UCD
1967 St Vincents
1966 Kilmacud Crokes St Columbas
1965 Young Irelands UCD
1964 St Vincents
1963 Junior Board Selection Young Irelands
1962 St Vincents St Columbas
1961 UCD
1960 St Vincents
1959 New Irelands
1958 New Irelands
1957 St Vincents
1956 St Columbas
1955 St Vincents
1954 St Vincents
1953 St Vincents
1952 Faughs Civil Service
1951 Eoghan Ruadhs St Vincents
1950 Faughs
1949 Young Irelands
1948 UCD
1947 UCD Faughs
1946 Faughs
1945 Faughs
1944 Faughs Eoghan Ruadhs
1943 Young Irelands 6-10 UCD 3-03
1942 Young Irelands
1941 Faughs Eoghan Ruadhs
1940 Faughs Eoghan Ruadhs
1939 Faughs Eoghan Ruadhs
1938 Army Metro
1937 Young Irelands
1936 Faughs
1935 Army Metro
1934 UCD
1933 Army Metro
1932 Young Irelands UCD
1931 Garda
1930 Faughs
1929 Garda
1928 Garda
1927 Garda
1926 Garda
1925 Garda
1924 Kickhams Young Irelands
1923 Faughs
1922 Faughs
1921 Faughs
1920 Faughs
1919 Collegians
1918 Collegians
1917 Collegians
1916 Commercials
1915 Faughs
1914 Faughs
1913 Thomas Davis
1912 Rapparees
1911 Faughs
1910 Faughs
1909 Commercials
1908 Kickhams
1907 Commercials
1906 Faughs
1905 Commercials
1904 Faughs
1903 Faughs
1902 No Competition
1901 Faughs
1900 Faughs
1899 Commercials
1898 Commercials
1897 Commercials
1896 Commercials
1895 Commercials
1894 Rapparees
1893 Davitts
1892 Faughs
1891 Rapparees
1890 Kickhams
1889 Kickhams
1888 Metropolitans

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ballyboden crowned Dublin hurling champions with win over Lucan". The Score. 10 November 2013. Retrieved 7 February 2014. 
  2. ^ Robert Ware (1678). The History and Antiquities of Dublin. Gilbert. p. 83. 
  3. ^ Jimmy Wren (1987). The Villages of Dublin. Tomar Publishing. p. 74. 
  4. ^ Jimmy Wren (1987). The Villages of Dublin. Tomar Publishing. p. 36. 
  5. ^ Jimmy Wren (1987). The Villages of Dublin. Tomar Publishing. p. 82. 
  6. ^ "Naomh Mearnóg". Fingal Independent. 20 December 2011. Retrieved 7 February 2014. 
  7. ^ Seamus J King (2005). A History of Hurling (2nd Ed.). Gill & Macmillan. p. 82. Retrieved 7 February 2014. 
  8. ^ Rouse, Paul. "Gaelic Games Through the Decades". hill16.ie. Dublin County Board. Retrieved 23 July 2011. 
  9. ^ "A Timeline of the Important Dates During the GAA's Lifetime". curtinsports.ie. Curtin Sports GAA Equipment. Retrieved 24 July 2011. 
  10. ^ de Búrca, Marcus (1980). The GAA: A History. Gaelic Athletic Association. p. 21. ISBN 978-0-9502722-1-4. 
  11. ^ Ryall, Tom; Gaelic Athletic Association (2001). Comhairle Laighean 1900-2000: Céad Bliain de Chluichí Gaelacha. Leinster GAA. p. 119. Retrieved 23 July 2011. 
  12. ^ a b Tom Ryall; Gaelic Athletic Association (2001). Comhairle Laighean 1900-2000: Céad Bliain de Chluichí Gaelacha. Leinster GAA. pp. 118–119. Retrieved 23 July 2011. 
  13. ^ "Dublin SHC: Ballyboden do the double". hoganstand.com (Lynn Group). 2 November 2009. Retrieved 23 July 2011. 
  14. ^ "Keaney stands and delivers to get Ballyboden over line". Irish Independent. 11 November 2013. Retrieved 11 November 2013. 
  15. ^ "Dublin SHC final: Crokes return to winners' enclosure". Hogan Stand. 15 October 2012. Retrieved 16 October 2012. 
  16. ^ "Boden make it five in-a-row". hill16.ie (Dublin County Board). 30 October 2011. Retrieved 30 October 2011. 

External links[edit]