Ducati Diavel

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Ducati Diavel
Ducati Diavel Carbon 2 modified.jpg
Manufacturer Ducati
Production 2011–
Class Cruiser
Engine 1,198.4 cc (73.13 cu in) 4-valve desmodromic liquid-cooled 90° V-twin.
Bore / stroke 106.0 mm × 67.9 mm (4.17 in × 2.67 in)
Compression ratio 11.5:1
Ignition type Electronic
Transmission 6-speed constant-mesh
Wet, hydraulic multi-plate slipper clutch
Frame type Steel trellis. Cast aluminium rear subframe
Suspension Aluminium single-sided swingarm
Brakes

Front: 2 × 320 mm semi-floating discs, radially mounted 4-piston, Brembo callipers, radial master cylinder
Rear: 265 mm disc, 2-piston calliper
ABS standard

Bosch-Brembo ABS
Tires Front: 120/70 ZR 17
Rear: 240/45 ZR17
Rake, trail 28°
Wheelbase 1,590 mm (63 in)
Seat height 770 mm (30 in)
Fuel capacity 17 L (3.7 imp gal; 4.5 US gal)

The Ducati Diavel is the second cruiser motorcycle from Ducati,[1] after the Indiana of 1986–1990. The 2011 model year Diavel debuted in November 2010 at the EICMA motorcycle show in Milan.[1]

The engine is a retuned version of the 1,198.4 cc (73.13 cu in) Testastretta from the 1198 superbike,[2] now called the Testastretta 11° for its 11° valve overlap (reduced from 41°).

Styling for the Diavel was developed in-house, although the project began under the leadership of Ducati's previous design chief, Pierre Terblanche, who commissioned Glynn Kerr, freelance designer and design columnist for Motorcycle Consumer News, to produce the initial concept sketches.[3] In the US, most Diavel buyers appear to be existing riders age 50 and over, with more women than usual attracted to the bike, and some Harley-Davidson owners, especially V-Rod riders, trading for the new Ducati power cruiser.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Hinchliffe, Mark (23 October 2010). "A Ducati kind of cruiser". The Mercury (Hobart). Retrieved 20 November 2010. 
  2. ^ 2011 Ducati Diavel Specifications, motorcycle-usa.com 
  3. ^ Kerr, Glynn (February 2011), "Design; Tricoloré Italiano", Motorcycle Consumer News (Irvine, California: Aviation News Corp) 42 (2): 38–39, ISSN 1073-9408 
  4. ^ Siler, Wes (2 December 2010), "Who's buying the Diavel?", Hell for Leather, retrieved 2011-03-07