Duke Blue Devils baseball

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Duke Blue Devils
Founded: 1903
Duke Blue Devils athletic logo

University Duke University
Conference ACC
Coastal Division
Location Durham, NC
Head Coach Chris Pollard (2nd year)
Home Stadium Jack Coombs Field
(Capacity: 2,000)
Nickname Blue Devils
Colors

Duke blue and White

            
College World Series Appearances
1952, 1953, 1961
NCAA Tournament Appearances
1952, 1953, 1956, 1957, 1961
Conference Tournament Champions
Southern Conference: 1951
Conference Champions
Southern Conference: 1937, 1938, 1939, 1951, 1952, 1953
Atlantic Coast Conference: 1956, 1957, 1961

The Duke Blue Devils baseball team is the varsity intercollegiate baseball program of Duke University, based in Durham, North Carolina, United States. The team has been a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference since the conference's founding in the 1954 season. The program's home venue is Jack Coombs Field, which opened in 1931. Chris Pollard has been the head coach of the team since the 2013 season. As of the end of the 2013 season, the Blue Devils have appeared in three College World Series in three NCAA Tournaments. They have won three ACC Championships. As of the start of the 2013 Major League Baseball season, 34 former Blue Devils players have played in Major League Baseball.

History[edit]

The baseball program began varsity play in 1889.[1] The vast majority of the program's successes came under head coaches Jack Coombs and Ace Parker from 1929–1966. Coombs led the Blue Devils to five Southern Conference championships and to a fifth place finish in the 1952 College World Series.[1] Taking over upon Coombs' retirement after the 1952 season, Parker led Duke to the 1953, and 1961 College World Series, one Southern Conference championship and three Atlantic Coast Conference championships.[1] Duke has not earned a bid to the NCAA Tournament since 1961, the longest drought of any ACC school.[2]

Steroid Controversy[edit]

In 2005, the program was the target of a controversy involving the use of anabolic steroids.[3] Five former players told the Duke Chronicle that head coach Bill Hillier had pressured players to use steroids, with two of those players admitting to having injected steroids in 2002.[3] In an open letter published in the Chronicle, another former player, Evan Anderson, confirmed that Hillier had pressured players to use steroids.[4] While Hillier denied the accusations, he was replaced as head coach after the 2005 season.[3]

Conference affiliations[edit]

Head coaches[edit]

Year(s) Coach Seasons W–L–T Pct
1901 Mr. Schock 1 6–5 .545
1902–1907 Otis Stocksdale 6 76–37–4 .650
1908–1914 M.T. Adkins 7 104–67–4 .594
1915–1916 Claude West 2 14–26–3 .326
1917 Heine Manush 1 4–6–1 .364
1919 Lee Gooch 1 19–4–2 .760
1920 Chick Doak 1 10–9 ..526
1921 Pat Egan 1 10–8–1 .526
1922 H.G. Steiner 1 12–6 .667
1923–1924 Howard Jones 2 31–8 .795
1925 Bill Towe 1 9–9 .500
1926–1928 G.B. Whitted 3 28–29–1 .483
1929–1952 Jack Coombs 24 381–171–3 .686
1953–1966 Ace Parker 14 166–162–4 .500
1966–1967 James Bly 2 15–34 .306
1968–1970 Tom Butters 3 43–53–1 .443
1971–1977 Enos Slaughter 7 68–120 .362
1978–1984 Tom D'Armi 7 125–98–2 .556
1985–1987 Larry Smith 3 61–58–4 .496
1988–1999 Steve Traylor 12 356–286–1 .554
2000–2005 Bill Hillier 6 121–214 .361
2006–2012 Sean McNally 7 192–198–1 .492
2013–present Chris Pollard 1 26–29 .473
TOTALS
1,895–1,622–34
.534

Year by year record[edit]

Current and former major league players[edit]

Source: [1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "2013 Media Guide". GoDuke.com. Retrieved 7 June 2013. 
  2. ^ "2012 ACC Baseball Guide". TheACC.com. 
  3. ^ a b c "STEROID CHARGES ROCK DUKE BASEBALL". Duke Chronicle. 14 April 2005. Retrieved 7 June 2013. 
  4. ^ Anderson, Evan (18 April 2005). "Steroid allegations are accurate". Duke Chronicle. Retrieved 7 June 2013.