Duke of Swabia

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The Duke of Swabia became the last great house of German Emperors, the Hohenstaufen.[1] Swabia was one of the five stem duchies of the medieval German kingdom, and its dukes were thus among the most powerful magnates of Germany. The most notable family to hold Swabia were the Hohenstaufen, who held it, with a brief interruption, from 1079 until 1268. For much of this period, the Hohenstaufen were also Holy Roman Emperors. With the death of Conradin, the last Hohenstaufen duke, the duchy itself disintegrated, although King Rudolf I attempted to revive it for his Habsburg family in the late-13th century.

Dukes of Alamannia (506–911)[edit]

Merovingian dukes[edit]

Carolingian dukes[edit]

Hunfriding[edit]

Dukes of Swabia (911–1268)[edit]

Map of the duchy of Swabia in the tenth and eleventh centuries (Swabia is marked in yellow; the kingdom of Upper Burgundy is green).

Miscellaneous houses[edit]

Conradines[edit]

House of Babenberg[edit]

Miscellaneous houses[edit]


House of Hohenstaufen, 1079–1208[edit]

Name Portrait Birth Marriages Death
Frederick I
1079–1105
1050
son of Frederick von Büren and Hildegard of Egisheim-Dagsburg
Agnes of Germany
1089
11 children
21 July 1105
aged 54 or 55
Frederick II the One-Eyed
1105–1147
Frederick II of Swabia.jpg 1090
son of Frederick I and Agnes of Germany
Judith of Bavaria
1121
2 children
Agnes of Saarbrücken
c.1132
2 children
6 April 1147
aged 56 or 57
Frederick III Barbarossa
1147–1152
Barbarossa.jpg 1122
son of Frederick II and Judith of Bavaria
Adelheid of Vohburg
2 March 1147
Eger
no children
Beatrice of Burgundy
9 June 1156
Würzburg
12 children
10 June 1190
aged 67 or 68
Frederick IV
1152–1167
Frederick IV of Swabia.jpg 1145
son of Conrad III of Germany and Gertrude von Sulzbach
Gertrude of Bavaria
1166
no children
19 August 1167
Rome
aged 21 or 22
Frederick V
1167–1170
16 July 1164
Pavia
son of Frederick III and Beatrice of Burgundy

unmarried
28 November 1170
aged 6
Frederick VI
1170–1191
FridrichSwabia.jpg February 1167
Modigliana
son of Frederick III and Beatrice of Burgundy

unmarried
20 January 1191
Acre
aged 24
Conrad II
1191–1196
Vad-0321 052 Konrad von Schwaben.jpg February or March 1173
son of Frederick III and Beatrice of Burgundy

unmarried
15 August 1196
Durlach
aged 23
Philip
1196–1208
Vad-0321 040 Philipp von Schwaben.jpg August 1177
son of Frederick III and Beatrice of Burgundy
Irene Angelina
25 May 1197
4 children
21 June 1208
Bamberg
aged 30

House of Welf, 1208–1212[edit]

Name Portrait Birth Marriages Death
Otto IV
1208–1212
Frederick I 1175
son of Henry the Lion, Duke of Bavaria and Saxony and Matilda Plantagenet
Beatrice of Hohenstaufen
1209 or 1212
no children

Marie of Brabant
19 May 1214
Aachen
no children
19 May 1218
Harzburg
aged 42 or 43

House of Hohenstaufen, 1212–1268[edit]

Name Portrait Birth Marriages Death
Frederick VII
1212–1216
Frederick I 26 December 1194
Jesi
son of Henry I and Constance of Sicily
Constance of Aragon
15 August 1209
1 child

Yolande of Jerusalem
9 November 1225
2 children

Isabella of England
15 July 1235
4 children
13 December 1250
Torremaggiore
aged 55
Henry II
1216–1235
Henry (II) 1211
Sicily
son of Frederick I and Constance of Aragon
Margaret
29 November 1225
2 children
12 February 1242
Martirano
aged 30
Conrad III
1235–1254
Conrad I 25 April 1228
Andria
son of Frederick I and Yolande of Jerusalem
Elisabeth of Bavaria
1 September 1246
1 child
21 May 1254
Lavello
aged 26
Conrad IV the Younger
1254–1268
Conrad II 25 March 1252
Wolfstein
son of Conrad I and Elisabeth of Bavaria
never married 29 October 1268
Naples
aged 16
(executed)

House of Habsburg (1282–1313)[edit]

Successor states[edit]

In the 13th century, the Duchy of Swabia disintegrated into numerous smaller states. Some of the more important immediate successor states were:

During the following century, several of these states were acquired by the County of Württemberg or the Duchy of Austria, as marked above. In 1803 Bavarian Swabia was annexed by Bavaria and shortly afterwards became part of the Kingdom of Bavaria.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Germany, the Stem Duchies & Marches". Friesian.com. 1945-02-13. Retrieved 2012-10-19.