Duncan Grinnell-Milne

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Duncan Grinnell-Milne
Born 1896
Bromley, London, England
Died November 1973 (aged 76 or 77)
Westminster, London, England
Allegiance United Kingdom British Empire
Service/branch Royal Flying Corps
Years of service 1914 – 1926; 1939 – 1940
Rank Captain
Unit Rifle Brigade, Royal Fusiliers,
No. 16 Squadron RFC
No. 56 Squadron RFC
No. 214 Squadron RAF, No. 14 Squadron RAF
Battles/wars First World War
Second World War
Awards Military Cross
Distinguished Flying Cross & Bar
Other work BBC, Author

Captain Duncan William Grinnell-Milne MC, DFC & Bar (1896 – 1973) was an English First World War pilot credited with six confirmed aerial victories, a prisoner of war, a flying ace and an author who successfully escaped from German captivity. Initially serving with the 7th Bn Royal Fusiliers, he was seconded to the Royal Flying Corps before joining the Royal Air Force.

World War I[edit]

Grinnell-Milne was commissioned in the Rifle Brigade at age 18 in 1914. He was considered too young for frontline service. In an effort to evade this restriction, he transferred to the Royal Fusiliers, and from there to the Royal Flying Corps. He underwent pilot's training, was posted to 16 Squadron, and on 28 November 1915, in a Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2c, he shot down an Albatros C.I. He was himself shot down on 16 May 1916,[1] and spent over two years as a prisoner of war. He finally escaped and returned to aerial combat with No. 56 Squadron, flying the S.E.5 until the end of the war. From 5 October to 3 November 1918 he was credited with five more air victories; his final tally was a reconnaissance plane, three Fokker D.VIIs, and an observation balloon destroyed, and a D.VII driven down out of control.[2]

Between the wars[edit]

Grinnell-Milne was assigned to 214 Squadron in Egypt in 1919. He moved on to 14 Squadron the next year. His last assignment was Assistant Air Attaché in Paris. In 1925 his son Robin was born.[3] By the time he left the RAF in 1926, he had flown 60 different aircraft types and had amassed over 2,000 hours flight time.[4]

World War II[edit]

He returned to service during World War II, and flew several missions over Libya. He was then invalided out. He joined the British Broadcast Corporation and stayed with them through 1946.[5]

Public Citations & Awards[edit]

Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC)[edit]

Supplement to the London Gazette, 8 February 1919 (31170/2039)

Sources of information[edit]

  1. ^ Pusher Aces of World War 1'. p. 27. 
  2. ^ Above the Trenches: A Complete Record of the Fighter Aces and Units of the British Empire Air Forces 1915-1920. pp. 177–178. 
  3. ^ Obituary Count Robin de la Lanne-Mirrlees
  4. ^ Above the Trenches: A Complete Record of the Fighter Aces and Units of the British Empire Air Forces 1915-1920. pp. 177–178. 
  5. ^ Above the Trenches: A Complete Record of the Fighter Aces and Units of the British Empire Air Forces 1915-1920. pp. 177–178. 

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]