Duncan G. Stroik

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Duncan G. Stroik

Duncan Gregory Stroik (born January 14, 1962) usually credited as Duncan G. Stroik, is an American architect, Professor of Architecture at the University of Notre Dame School of Architecture and founding editor of the Sacred Architecture Journal. His work continues the tradition of classical and Palladian architecture, also known as New Classical Architecture.

Stroik specializes in all aspects of Roman Catholic sacred architecture. In his academic work, Stroik has advocated beauty and tradition as the standards of architecture.[1]

Early Life and Career[edit]

Holy Family Chapel, Nebraska

Stroik received a bachelor's degree from the University of Virginia School of Architecture in 1984 and a master's degree in architecture from Yale School of Architecture in 1987. After graduating from Yale, Stroik worked as a designer in the office of Allan Greenberg. In 1990 Stroik joined the Notre Dame School of Architecture as a founding faculty member of the school's classical program. In that same year Stroik founded his firm Duncan G. Stroik Architect LLC.

Institute for Sacred Architecture and The Sacred Architecture Journal[edit]

In 1998 Professor Stroik founded the Institute for Sacred Architecture and the Sacred Architecture Journal as editor. The Institute for Sacred Architecture is a non-profit organization that is dedicated to a renewal of beauty in contemporary church design. Twice yearly the institute produces the Sacred Architecture Journal, a periodical dedicated to the ongoing discussion of the issues current in the field of sacred architecture.

Major Projects[edit]

Our Lady of the Most Holy Trinity Chapel, Thomas Aquinas College

Major Projects include:

Thomas Aquinas College Chapel[edit]

Set in the heart of the Thomas Aquinas College campus, Our Lady of the Most Holy Trinity Chapel was dedicated on March 7, 2009.[2] Stroik’s design for this 15,000-square-foot (1,400 m2), $23 million chapel references Early Christian, Spanish Mission and Renaissance architecture.[1] Stroik designed the chapel as cruciform in shape and featuring both a 135-foot (41 m) bell tower and an 89-foot (27 m) dome.[3] In 2003 Pope John Paul II blessed the chapel’s plans, and in 2008, Pope Benedict XVI blessed its cornerstone.[4]

Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe[edit]

The Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe

The Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe, in La Crosse, Wisconsin is the vision of Cardinal Raymond Leo Burke who wanted to create a national pilgrimage site in the Diocese of La Crosse. The shrine is situated amidst 70 acres (280,000 m2) of woodland near the south end of La Crosse. On July 31, 2008 the Shrine Church was dedicated,[5][6] with the dedication Mass presided over by Cardinal Burke, who was joined by Cardinals Justin Rigali of Philadelphia and Francis George of Chicago.[7]

Organ Case at the Cathedral of Saint Paul, Minnesota[edit]

The organ case at the Cathedral of Saint Paul, National Shrine of the Apostle Paul draws from the original unbuilt design by Emmanuel Louis Masqueray but also refines it, preserving the view of the rose window. The existing split organ system was restored and 123 new organ pipes have been installed. The new organ case is constructed of walnut with hand carved detailing and gilding. Two human sized hand carved angels with instruments adorn the organ case while Saint Cecilia, patron saint of music, stands atop the central dome below the rose window. There is choir loft seating between the organ case.

A Selection of Publications[edit]

  • Church Building as a Sacred Place: Beauty, Transcendence, and the Eternal (2012)
  • Reconquering Sacred Space 2000: The Church in the City of the Third Millennium" (2012) Edited by Duncan Stroik, Cristiano Rosponi, and Giampaolo Rossi

Selected Awards[edit]

  • "Palladio Award" for Restoration and Renovation of The Cathedral of Saint Joseph (2013) Traditional Building Magazine
  • "Henry Hering Memorial Medal: Art and Architecture Award" for the Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe (2012) National Sculpture Society
  • "Indiana Design Award" for the Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe (2012) American Institute of Architects, Indiana
  • "Palladio Award" for New Design & Construction - less than 30,000 sq.ft. for Our Lady of the Most Holy Trinity (2011) Traditional Building Magazine
  • "Tucker Design Award" for Our Lady of the Most Holy Trinity Chapel (2010) Building Stone Institute
  • "Brick in Architecture Award" for Saint Theresa Education Center (2010) Brick Industry Association
  • "Indiana Design Award" for Villa Indiana (1998) American Institute of Architects, Indiana

Bibliography[edit]

  • Elizabeth Lev. "Beautiful Homes for Communion with God." Zenit (July 5, 2013).
  • Jennifer Adams. "Cathedral undergoes a 'creative restoration'." Stone World Magazine (May 2013): 70-79.
  • Martha McDonald. "Creative Restoration." Traditional Building (December 2012): 28-31.
  • Joseph Pronechen. "Altar Rails Returns to Use." National Catholic Register (July 2011): B4.
  • Lynne Lavelle. "Sacred Mission." Traditional Building (June 2011): 20-23.
  • Alexis Fisher. "Chapel Design Reflects College Mission." Stone World Magazine (July 2010): 116-128.
  • Catesby Leigh. "A Return to Grace." Wall Street Journal (March 18, 2010): D7.
  • Bradford McKee. "Our Lady of the Most Holy Trinity." Architect (December 2009): 69-76.

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ a b "Chapel". Catholic Spirit. Retrieved 2010-04-29. 
  2. ^ "News". Ventura County Star. Retrieved 2010-01-13. 
  3. ^ "A Sign of Contradiction". Inside the Vatican. Retrieved 2010-01-13. 
  4. ^ "Chapel". Adoremus Bulletin. Retrieved 201o-01-014.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  5. ^ La Crosse Tribune - 7.0 : 'Return to Beauty': Shrine could bring international spotlight to La Crosse
  6. ^ La Crosse Tribune - 7.0 : Archbishop dedicates shrine's Rosary Walk
  7. ^ Welcome to the Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe

External links[edit]