Dunellen, New Jersey

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Dunellen, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Dunellen
Dunellen highlighted in Middlesex County. Inset: location of Middlesex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Dunellen highlighted in Middlesex County. Inset: location of Middlesex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Dunellen, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Dunellen, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°35′25″N 74°27′56″W / 40.590231°N 74.465595°W / 40.590231; -74.465595Coordinates: 40°35′25″N 74°27′56″W / 40.590231°N 74.465595°W / 40.590231; -74.465595[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Middlesex
Incorporated October 28, 1887
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Robert J. Seader (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Clerk William M. Robins[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 1.048 sq mi (2.715 km2)
 • Land 1.048 sq mi (2.715 km2)
 • Water 0.000 sq mi (0.000 km2)  0.00%
Area rank 495th of 566 in state
23rd of 25 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 52 ft (16 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 7,227
 • Estimate (2013)[10] 7,346
 • Rank 313th of 566 in state
21st of 25 in county[11]
 • Density 6,894.8/sq mi (2,662.1/km2)
 • Density rank 66th of 566 in state
4th of 25 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08812[12][13]
Area code(s) 732 and 908[14]
FIPS code 3402318490[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0885198[17][2]
Website dunellenborough.net

Dunellen is a borough in Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 7,227,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 404 (+5.9%) from the 6,823 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 295 (+4.5%) from the 6,528 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Dunellen was formed as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on October 28, 1887, when it broke away from Piscataway Township, based on the results of a referendum held on March 23, 1886. Dunellen's incorporation was confirmed on April 15, 1914.[19]

Geography[edit]

Dunellen is located at 40°35′25″N 74°27′56″W / 40.590231°N 74.465595°W / 40.590231; -74.465595 (40.590231,-74.465595). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.048 square miles (2.715 km2), all of which is land.[1][2] Dunellen is in the Raritan Valley, a line of communities in central New Jersey. Dunellen is in the central division along with Bound Brook, South Bound Brook and Middlesex.

History[edit]

Dunellen grew from its start in 1867 with the construction of a railroad station, which was originally called New Market station, serving the nearby community of the same name in Piscataway.[20] When it was originally constructed, the tracks were at grade level with North Avenue and the railroad was the Elizabethtown and Somerville Railroad, which later became part of the Central Railroad of New Jersey. The railroad brought industry to the area.

The Art Color factory built in 1925 was Dunellen's principal industry and produced as many as 10 million magazines a month. The W. F. Hall Printing Company of Chicago bought Art Color in 1931, and ran it until 1968, when it closed the plant there.[21]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 817
1890 1,060 29.7%
1900 1,239 16.9%
1910 1,990 60.6%
1920 3,394 70.6%
1930 5,148 51.7%
1940 5,360 4.1%
1950 6,291 17.4%
1960 6,840 8.7%
1970 7,072 3.4%
1980 6,593 −6.8%
1990 6,528 −1.0%
2000 6,823 4.5%
2010 7,227 5.9%
Est. 2013 7,346 [10] 1.6%
Population sources:
1880-1920[22] 1880-1890[23]
1890-1910[24] 1910-1930[25]
1930-1990[26] 2000[27][28] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 7,227 people, 2,566 households, and 1,763 families residing in the borough. The population density was 6,894.8 per square mile (2,662.1 /km2). There were 2,683 housing units at an average density of 2,559.7 per square mile (988.3 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 73.46% (5,309) White, 8.62% (623) Black or African American, 0.26% (19) Native American, 4.51% (326) Asian, 0.06% (4) Pacific Islander, 9.67% (699) from other races, and 3.42% (247) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 26.75% (1,933) of the population.[7]

There were 2,566 households, of which 33.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.4% were married couples living together, 13.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.3% were non-families. 24.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.81 and the average family size was 3.36.[7]

In the borough, 23.7% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.8% from 18 to 24, 30.9% from 25 to 44, 26.8% from 45 to 64, and 9.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37.1 years. For every 100 females there were 101.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.4 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $74,375 (with a margin of error of +/- $13,504) and the median family income was $88,527 (+/- $13,868). Males had a median income of $48,542 (+/- $13,495) versus $43,920 (+/- $12,613) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $30,960 (+/- $3,015). About 5.6% of families and 8.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.8% of those under age 18 and 9.5% of those age 65 or over.[29]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 6,823 people, 2,451 households, and 1,710 families residing in the borough. The population density was 6,573.9 people per square mile (2,533.1/km2). There were 2,520 housing units at an average density of 2,428.0 per square mile (935.6/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 84.07% White, 3.66% African American, 0.25% Native American, 3.56% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 6.38% from other races, and 2.07% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 14.80% of the population.[27][28]

There were 2,451 households out of which 33.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.4% were married couples living together, 10.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.2% were non-families. 23.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.75 and the average family size was 3.30.[27][28]

In the borough the population was spread out with 24.9% under the age of 18, 6.9% from 18 to 24, 36.0% from 25 to 44, 20.9% from 45 to 64, and 11.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 101.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.2 males.[27][28]

The median income for a household in the borough was $59,205, and the median income for a family was $67,188. Males had a median income of $45,000 versus $34,130 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $26,529. About 1.4% of families and 3.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.0% of those under age 18 and 4.2% of those age 65 or over.[27][28]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Dunellen is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[5]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Dunellen is Republican Robert Seader, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015. Members of the Borough Council (with party and term-end year in parentheses) are Council President Kenneth Baudendistel (R, 2015), Thomas Cote (D, 2015), Kenneth Bayer (R, 2014), Mark Bieniek (D, 2014), Jason Cilento (I, 2013) and Joseph Petracca (R, 2013).[30]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Dunellen is located in the 12th Congressional District[31] and is part of New Jersey's 22nd state legislative district.[8][32][33] Prior to the 2010 Census, Dunellen had been part of the 6th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[34]

New Jersey's Twelfth Congressional District is represented by Rush D. Holt, Jr. (D, Hopewell Township).[35] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[36][37] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[38][39]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 22nd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Nicholas Scutari (D, Linden) and in the General Assembly by Jerry Green (D, Plainfield) and Linda Stender (D, Scotch Plains).[40][41] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[42] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[43]

Middlesex County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose seven members are elected at-large to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in January, the board selects from among its members a Freeholder Director and Deputy Director. As of 2014, Middlesex County's Freeholders (with committee chairmanship, party affiliation, residence and term-end year listed in parentheses) are Freeholder Director Ronald G. Rios (Ex-officio on all committees - D, term ends December 31, 2015; Carteret),[44] Freeholder Deputy Director Carol Barrett Bellante (County Administration - D, 2014; Monmouth Junction, South Brunswick Township),[45] Kenneth Armwood (Business Development and Education - D, 2016; Piscataway),[46] Charles Kenny (Finance - D, 2016; Woodbridge Township),[47] H. James Polos (Public Safety and Health - D, 2015; Highland Park),[48] Charles E. Tomaro (Infrastructure Management - D, 2014; Edison)[49] and Blanquita B. Valenti (Community Services - D, 2016; New Brunswick).[50][51][52][53][54] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Elaine M. Flynn (D; Old Bridge Township),[55] Sheriff Mildred S. Scott (D, 2016; Piscataway)[56] and Surrogate Kevin J. Hoagland (D, 2017; New Brunswick).[51][57]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 3,775 registered voters in Dunellen, of which 1,063 (28.2%) were registered as Democrats, 726 (19.2%) were registered as Republicans and 1,983 (52.5%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 3 voters registered to other parties.[58]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 52.9% of the vote here (1,478 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 44.5% (1,244 votes) and other candidates with 1.8% (50 votes), among the 2,794 ballots cast by the borough's 3,883 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.0%.[59] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 50.0% of the vote here (1,260 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 48.0% (1,211 votes) and other candidates with 1.2% (44 votes), among the 2,521 ballots cast by the borough's 3,666 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 68.8.[60]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 54.6% of the vote here (944 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 34.1% (589 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 8.9% (153 votes) and other candidates with 1.9% (33 votes), among the 1,728 ballots cast by the borough's 3,744 registered voters, yielding a 46.2% turnout.[61]

Education[edit]

The Dunellen Public Schools serve students in pre-Kindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[62]) are John P. Faber School[63] (grades PreK-5; 558 students), Lincoln Middle School[64] (6-8; 260) and Dunellen High School[65] (9-12; 300).[66]

Transportation[edit]

The Dunellen station offers New Jersey Transit service on the Raritan Valley Line.[67] There is a ticket office open only during morning rush hour and a small waiting area at this stop. There are now automated ticket machines located next to the office. A simple station, there are two tracks with two small side platforms. The station is located on a high embankment.[68]

NJ Transit bus service is provided on the 113 and 114 routes to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan.[69]

Organizations[edit]

  • JugglingLife, a non-profit organization whose purpose is to inspire and emotionally heal disadvantaged children through juggling.

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Dunellen include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Municipal Clerk, Borough of Dunellen. Accessed November 22, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 98.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Dunellen, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Dunellen borough, Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 30, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 9. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Dunellen borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed May 30, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 22, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Dunellen, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 22, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 9, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Dunellen, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 8, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed May 30, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed November 22, 2012.
  19. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 170. Accessed May 30, 2012.
  20. ^ Loyer, Susan. "DUNELLEN Tremendous effort by parents, tremendous fun for kids", Home News Tribune, June 5, 2005. Accessed May 30, 2012. "Originally part of Piscataway, Dunellen was established in 1867 and grew up around the New Jersey Central Railroad station, which was known as New Market station."
  21. ^ Arnold A. Schwartz, Dunellen Public Library. Accessed April 1, 2008.
  22. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 9, 2013.
  23. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 98. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed November 22, 2012.
  24. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 337. Accessed May 30, 2012.
  25. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed May 30, 2012.
  26. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed May 30, 2012.
  27. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Dunellen borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 30, 2012.
  28. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Dunellen borough, Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 22, 2012.
  29. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Dunellen borough, Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 30, 2012.
  30. ^ Mayor and Council, Borough of Dunellen. Accessed May 30, 2012.
  31. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  32. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 56, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  33. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  34. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 56, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  35. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  36. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  37. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  38. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  39. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  40. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 6, 2014.
  41. ^ District 22 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 6, 2014.
  42. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  43. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  44. ^ Ronald G. Rios, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  45. ^ Carol Barrett Bellante, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  46. ^ Kenneth Armwood, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  47. ^ Charles Kenny, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  48. ^ H. James Polos, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  49. ^ Charles E. Tomaro, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  50. ^ Blanquita B. Valenti, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  51. ^ a b Elected County Officials, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  52. ^ 11/5/2013 General Election Unofficial Results, Middlesex County, November 12, 2013. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  53. ^ Staff. "Middlesex County election results 2012", NJ.com, November 6, 2012, updated November 13, 2012. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  54. ^ Staff. "Middlesex County election results 2011", The Star-Ledger, November 8, 2011. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  55. ^ County Clerk, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  56. ^ Sheriff, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  57. ^ Surrogate, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  58. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Middlesex, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 22, 2012.
  59. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Middlesex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed November 22, 2012.
  60. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Middlesex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed November 22, 2012.
  61. ^ 2009 Governor: Middlesex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed November 22, 2012.
  62. ^ Data for the Dunellen Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 22, 2012.
  63. ^ John P. Faber School, Dunellen Public Schools. Accessed October 9, 2013.
  64. ^ Lincoln Middle School, Dunellen Public Schools. Accessed October 9, 2013.
  65. ^ Dunellen High School, Dunellen Public Schools. Accessed October 9, 2013.
  66. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Dunellen Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 9, 2013.
  67. ^ Raritan Valley Line, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 8, 2013.
  68. ^ Dunellen station, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 8, 2013.
  69. ^ Middlesex County Bus/Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed September 3, 2011.
  70. ^ Staff. "'Bob' Fitzsimmons Robbed.", The New York Times, March 19, 1913. Accessed May 30, 2012. "The home of 'Bob' Fitzsimmons, the ex-champion prizefighter, at Dunellen, was robbed of $1500 worth of silverware some time within the last few days, while the family was away."
  71. ^ Bob Maier, Baseball-Reference.com. Accessed May 30, 2012.
  72. ^ Staff. "W.M. RICE'S SUDDEN DEATH; Detectives at Work on Lines Which They Do Not Disclose. A.T. PATRICK'S STATEMENT Charles F. Jones Says He Was Instructed to Withhold the News that His Employer Was Dead.", The New York Times, September 27, 1900. Accessed May 30, 2012. "During his visits to the North he lived part of the time at Dunellen, N. J., and later at the Grenoble, Seventh Avenue and Fifty-sixth Street."
  73. ^ LaGorce, Tammy. "IN PERSON; Gotcha! Stay Tuned", The New York Times, January 1, 2006. Accessed May 30, 2012. "'It's great when people you admire like what you're doing,' Mr. Scharpling, who grew up in Dunellen, writes for Monk in Summit and lives with his wife in Woodbridge, said before a recent Best Show."
  74. ^ Staff. "J.J. Awaits Draft; New Jersey Sports Canada Interested", The New York Times, January 26, 1974. Accessed May 30, 2012. "Frank Umont of Dunellen, the former major league umpire who also played for the New York Football Giants in the 1940's also will be on the dais..."

External links[edit]