Dungeon (BDSM)

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A St. Andrew's Cross at a professional New York City dungeon.

In BDSM (bondage/discipline, Dominance/submission, sadism/masochism) sexual play, a dungeon is any space set aside for "scene" activities.

Private dungeons are often fabricated in residential basements or spare rooms. BDSM organizations sometimes secure space for their members to play; old warehouses and factory spaces are popular for this, especially in areas where zoning laws forbid clubs of this type in residential areas, or close to schools or churches. Some dungeons are open to the public on a membership basis or as a nightclub. These are called "public dungeons" even if they are only open to members.

Dungeon equipment.

A professional dominant or dominatrix will often maintain his or her own dungeon, or several ProDoms may join together in a common facility often called a 'ProDom house', where they may share staff such as receptionists or cleaning staff.

More recently, since the BDSM community has become more established, the emergence of specialist dungeons for hire has occurred, specifically for couples to explore their sexual activity more deeply without the need for a large up-front investment.

It is common for a dungeon space to be fitted with attachments for shackles and cuffs, as well as numerous other forms of furniture for BDSM play including, but not limited to, stocks, cages, spanking benches, and so forth. Many are quite elaborately decorated, with expensive furnishings and appointments in styles from Bauhaus to Baroque— but even a simple closet or storage room is sometimes used as a dungeon.

When clubs or organizations run a BDSM dungeon, one or more persons who have been trained in BDSM safety are usually appointed as "dungeon monitors" to ensure safe and responsible play.

Literature[edit]

  • Jay Wiseman: SM 101: A Realistic Introduction. Greenery Press (CA) 1998, ISBN 0-9639763-8-9
  • Philip Miller, Molly Devon: Screw the Roses, Send Me the Thorns: The Romance and Sexual Sorcery of Sadomasochism, Mystic Rose Books, 1995. ISBN 0-9645960-0-8.
  • Dossie Easton, Janet W. Hardy: The New Topping Book. Greenery Press (CA) 2002, ISBN 1-890159-36-0

See also[edit]