Dungeon Tiles

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Dungeon Tiles
Dungeon Tiles.jpg
Genre Role-playing game
Publisher Wizards of the Coast
Publication date
2006 - 2008

The Dungeon Tiles series consists of seven supplements to the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game.

Contents[edit]

Dungeon Tiles (DT1), the first set in the series, contains six durable, fully illustrated dungeon grids, featuring rooms and passages of various sizes, plus doors, walls and other terrain features that can be used for D&D encounters.

'Arcane Corridors (DT2) contains six dungeon grids, featuring arcane chambers, corridors, and passages of various sizes, plus doors, magic circles and other terrain elements.

'Hidden Crypts (DT3) contains six dungeon grids, featuring rooms, corridors, and passages of various sizes, plus doors, walls and other terrain elements.

'Ruins of the Wild (DT4) contains six map grids, featuring wilderness locales, ruins, rivers and other terrain elements.

'Lost Caverns of the Underdark (DT5) contains six map grids, featuring subterranean locales, lava pits, underground rivers and other terrain elements.

Dire Tombs (DT6) contains six map grids, featuring haunted tombs, lost temples, web-filled catacombs and other terrain elements.

'Fane of the Forgotten Gods (DT7) contains six map grids, featuring lost temples, magical traps and other terrain elements.

Publication history[edit]

Dungeon Tiles and Arcane Corridors were published in 2006, and Hidden Crypts and Ruins of the Wild were published in 2007. Lost Caverns of the Underdark was designed by James Wyatt and illustrated by Jason Engle, published in September 2007. Dire Tombs was designed by Bruce R. Cordell and Chris Perkins and illustrated by Jason Engle, published in December 2007. Fane of the Forgotten Gods was designed by Bruce R. Cordell, Christopher Perkins, and James Wyatt, and illustrated by Jason Engle, published in March 2008.

Reception[edit]

One reviewer from Pyramid wondered: "Why it took Wizards of the Coast so long to milk this cash cow (or, more accurately, milk it anew) isn't clear, but in a field that, in the last six months, has turned positively lousy with mapping accoutrements and programs from several companies, you have to be cautious enough to wonder if Dungeons & Dragons Dungeon Tiles is worth it."[1] Another reviewer commented regarding Wizards of the Coast that "it's nice to see they've at least kept up one of their lines long enough to produce the promised next installment in their Dungeon Tiles line. Arcane Corridors offers a mystic bent in its selection."[2]

References[edit]