Dunsborough, Western Australia

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Dunsborough
Western Australia
Dunsborough is located in Western Australia
Dunsborough
Dunsborough
Coordinates 33°37′0″S 115°6′0″E / 33.61667°S 115.10000°E / -33.61667; 115.10000Coordinates: 33°37′0″S 115°6′0″E / 33.61667°S 115.10000°E / -33.61667; 115.10000
Population 3,371 (2006 Census)[1]
Established 1879
Postcode(s) 6281
Elevation 10 m (33 ft)
Location
LGA(s) Shire of Busselton
State electorate(s) Vasse
Federal Division(s) Forrest

Dunsborough is a coastal town in the South West of Western Australia, 254 kilometres (158 mi) south of Perth on the shores of Geographe Bay.

Dunsborough is a popular tourist destination for Western Australians; in 1999 it was voted the state's best tourist destination and in 2013 awarded the Top Tourism Award for Population Under 5,000. During the last decade the town has grown quickly and become quite affluent; consequently cafes and boutique stores have popped up everywhere. The town's location in Margaret River Wine Region provides easy access to many wineries and breweries. The town is a favoured destination for annual school leavers in WA, the other frequent choice being Rottnest Island.

Aboriginal (Nyungar) History & Culture[edit]

The South West region of Australia, within which Dunsborough sits, is recognised as being one of the oldest continually occupied human habitats anywhere on Earth, with a history dating back approximately 40,000 years.[2] Dunsborough itself shares in this history, with multiple sites of Aboriginal importance in and around the town. Prior to European colonisation, several distinct tribes inhabited the land and utilised the waters around Dunsborough. Those living on the coast were called Waddarn-di (sea people), and their language recorded as Burron Wongi.[3] These Indigenous peoples referred to Dunsborough by the name of Quedjinup, which means 'Place of Women'. The name Quedjinup is retained for the district immediately to the south of Dunsborough, encompassing the Dunsborough Lakes and Biddle's Common housing developments which form part of the greater Dunsborough development zone. Important local Aboriginal Heritage sites include:

  • Caves Road - Naturaliste Road Roundabout: a large area, extending some 400m east of the current roundabout, within which many artefacts including flints, crystal quartz, and blades have been discovered. The artefacts discovered at this site have been dated between 8,000 - 12,000 years old. The site is on the 'Permanent Register' of Aboriginal sites, and is protected under the West Australian Aboriginal Heritage Act (1972).
  • The Seymour Street Camping Grounds: located between what was Seymour Street (now Cape Naturaliste Road) and Naturaliste Terrace, and again on the southern side of the wet ground within the playing fields, including part of the playing field itself and where the netball courts now stand.
  • Dunn Bay Road Ceremonial Ground: a reported 'law ground' that was a ceremonital meeting site that brought traditinoal Wardandi people together.

European History[edit]

The modern town is named after the nearby Dunn Bay, which was named after Captain Richard Dalling Dunn under whom Governor James Stirling had served in the Hibernia and the Armide in 1810-11. Land for a townsite was set aside here in the late 1830s, and there is a recorded whale fishery at "Dunsbro" in 1850. When Dunsborough first appeared on a map in 1839 it was spelt "Dunnsbro" but the extra "n" seems to have disappeared by 1850, and the spelling of "bro" was amended to "borough" when the name was gazetted in 1879.[4]

Transport[edit]

Dunsborough is serviced by Busseltons public bus service route 903 run by South West Coach Lines. South west coach lines and Transwa coach services also run service to Dunsbrough for connections to other south west towns and Perth.

Annual events[edit]

  • Jetts Fitness Adventure Race
  • Dunsborough Arts Festival and Sculpture By The Bay
  • Dunsborough Bay Fun Run
  • Dunsborough Lions Easter Fair

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]